AuthorTopic: Legally Colorblind  (Read 15376 times)

Offline ptoing

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #20 on: August 14, 2013, 10:19:47 pm
They are for people making graphic design and other things, to make sure what they are doing looks decent and readable for colourblind folks as well.
There are no ugly colours, only ugly combinations of colours.

Offline Ai

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #21 on: August 14, 2013, 11:55:26 pm
^^

All of the above mentioned programs have other filters as well. Since the additional information is there and it's just that you don't fully perceive it, you can partially detect it via transforms. Facet's original reply probably wasn't particularly well thought out qua what is immediately useful for those who -are- colorblind, but you may be able to recover some information via gamma or contrast filters.
Maybe a filter that transposes RGB channels would be useful to you (I'm not sure, as I personally don't have any known degree of colorblindness) -- I don't know about Photoshop, but both GIMP and GPick implement display filters via simple plugins, so such a filter would be a fairly straightforward thing to write.

I wrote the Quantization filter for GPick myself, and of the 100-odd lines of that, the core filter is implemented in only 6 lines -- much of the rest is just boilerplate.

GIMP's Gamma filter is a good example of a simple GIMP display filter, and it's similar in complexity -- more boilerplate, but the core behaviour is implemented in ~12 lines.

It's unclear whether Photoshop supports proper display filter plugins, or if it's limited to the hardcoded behaviour of the color-proofing options.
Fortunately, given color proofing functionality and an appropriate target ICC profile, it is possible to perform arbitrary transforms of the image colorspace (as in the above example of transposing the RGB channels), but I don't personally understand how one constructs an appropriate ICC profile. Probably investigating littlecms2 would be enlightening in that regard.
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Offline ErekT

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #22 on: August 15, 2013, 03:01:54 am
Quote
I find that dark yellow looks very green..
I thought it was due to my color deficiency, but maybe it's like that for everyone? I just tend to make the shadows more red.
If I take a pure yellow and make it dark, HSL < 50, it does look kinda green. Cammo-green. I have no color deficiency that I know of.

Offline Ai

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #23 on: August 15, 2013, 06:48:44 am
That's perfectly normal, and AFAICS it just reflects that additive mixing (eg. LCD screens) works differently from subtractive mixing (eg. paint).
It's only slightly about how HSL is a bad colorspace and it should feel bad. ;)
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Offline Facet

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #24 on: August 15, 2013, 10:58:46 pm
Yeah, it would actually be good to have a color blind gui designer
But those filters are just for regular people, to show how the image looks for people with color blindness.
?

For those personally affected: as Ai, I'm really not sure what kind of cues would be helpful to signpost invisible colours (there's almost certainly stuff out there already though), but we visualise other parts of the spectrum currently via compression into our own range with groovy rainbow things and such.

*'infrared' thermal vision


*'ultraviolet' insect vision


Even a straight warmer/cooler (colour) indication could be pretty useful for those with major discrepancies.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2013, 06:56:59 pm by Facet »

Offline Ai

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #25 on: August 16, 2013, 01:18:07 am
^ HSL or LCH decomposition (specifically, taking the 'hue' channel from an image) seems like it might help. In GIMP this is available by default, in Colors->Components->Decompose (then you need to select the colorspace to decompose in). The output is a set of three grayscale layers in a new image, with the topmost conveniently being H.
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Offline Argyle

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #26 on: August 16, 2013, 10:23:51 am


Ought to look at that test on my 2 other PCs / 3 other monitors as a catalyst for comparing how differently my monitors are calibrated and effecting my perception of color.

Offline Seiseki

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #27 on: August 17, 2013, 12:51:59 am
Yeah, it would actually be good to have a color blind gui designer
But those filters are just for regular people, to show how the image looks for people with color blindness.
?

For those personally affected: as Ai, I'm really not sure what kind of cues would be helpful to signpost invisible colours (there's almost certainly stuff out there already though), but we visualise other parts of the spectrum currently with groovy rainbow things and such.

Even a straight warmer/cooler (colour) indication could be pretty useful for those with major discrepancies.

I really hope that flower is completely yellow, or my color deficiency is worse than I though..
And those cups look the same to me :o

(you scared the crap out of me, had to check the rgb values in photoshop...)

Offline ptoing

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #28 on: August 17, 2013, 01:00:40 am
Uh wait, that version of the flower on the right is a simulation of how bees might see them, right?
There are no ugly colours, only ugly combinations of colours.

Offline Facet

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Re: Legally Colorblind

Reply #29 on: August 17, 2013, 05:24:14 pm
Ah yeah, sorry; just random visualisations of stuff outside the visible EM spectrum as analogy to how a filter could transpose colours into a more limited range for the colourblind. Top: 'infrared' thermal vision (hot and cold drinks), bottom: 'ultraviolet' bee vision (targets/landing strips). Ai's method sounds good, I might mess about with a working example.

Ptoing, you know your bees :D.