AuthorTopic: Amature-Novice seeking Shading Help  (Read 2490 times)

Offline Jsrs

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Amature-Novice seeking Shading Help

on: December 31, 2012, 09:47:10 am
pixel b hurrd


But seriously though. I worked very hard, for the most part I'm satisfied with the structural work, I know, gotta work on dem glasses and such, but I'm just... man. Shading man.

How. Does it. Even. Christ.

Offline snv

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: +0/-1
    • View Profile

Re: Amature-Novice seeking Shading Help

Reply #1 on: December 31, 2012, 11:50:08 am
If you know geometry and light source, you can probably use something like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gouraud_shading

load up a 3d editor and see how it interpolates shade across polygon/nurbs/whatever

Offline Cage

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 49
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
    • My portfolio

Re: Amature-Novice seeking Shading Help

Reply #2 on: December 31, 2012, 07:09:30 pm
As far as pixel tech goes: The outline of the skin parts, using the darker skin tone, create a lot of banding. What's banding? Read about it here http://www.wayofthepixel.net/index.php?topic=8110.msg92434#msg92434 The double pixel lines on the top of the look weird in addition to creating banding. You might want to experiment with your lines - because of the nature of pixelart, not all angular lines look good - depending on the angle. Two ways to tackle it - either try a different angle or soften it with AA (anti aliasing - the previous link covers pixel art specific hand made anti aliasing).

If you have trouble with shading objects, I recommend you read about about construction - in drawing and in art in general. This will help you with both shading and with getting a feel of 3dness ;)

In general this works like this - think about the thing you want to portray - with what spatial forms can you 'build' it?

Here's a page from Andrew Loomis' Successful Drawing Book:


If you know what shapes your object is "made of" and you know how the light will behave on them - you should know how to shade it ;)

As far as your character goes - you could detail the ear a bit - if you want to keep it cartoon, you could go the MLP route and just add a line there - in case of a human ear, a line would just give a general idea of the tragus and helix (I hope those are the right names). Also, I find the "lidless" eyes a bit too weird. Just add ridge above the eye and you should be all set. Despite doing a stylized character, check out some photo reference.