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Messages - eishiya
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11
Pixel Art / Re: Understanding water flow in top down perspective
« on: March 25, 2019, 11:23:46 pm »
The way you're thinking about it currently-yes. Sinusoidal deformations occur in 3D rather than 2D, and the resulting effects on reflections do not resemble sine waves (due to their shapes being determined by the angles of incidence and therefore being only indirectly influenced by the wave motion), so it doesn't make much sense to draw them as such.

If you want to understand water in a mathematical way, then you'd need to work in 3D, as 2D necessarily obscures some important information. If you want to learn how to draw good-looking 2D water, then you shouldn't worry too much about the mathematics and focus on observing the effects, spend time looking at water (ideally, in real life so you can change your viewing angle, mess with the water surface, etc, but videos can be helpful too). Try animating some non-looping water from reference, at various angles and with various kinds of waves. You can always make it loop later once you have a better feel for how it works. Just as with walk cycles, billowing clothing, etc, IRL there aren't perfect loops for most natural things, but we animators always find a way to make it work by fudging the details :]

12
Pixel Art / Re: Understanding water flow in top down perspective
« on: March 25, 2019, 09:52:35 pm »


In addition, due to the Fresnel effect, water appears less reflective the higher your viewing angle is. This means that if your tiles are from-above or typical 3/4 RPG view, there should probably not be reflections at all, or only minimal reflections, and instead we'd see through the surface of the water and into the depths.

This is not 3/4 perspective but it still have reflection from trees from top down view... So If there is more stuff near by the pond.. Should it reflect other stuff like Tree etc?

https://i.imgur.com/iAYFRQU.png
In that image, it's not reflections but shadows, which would only change a little bit as the water moved. The reflections in that image are very faint, and notice how you can see through the (murky!) water a little near the sides due to the angle.

13
Pixel Art / Re: Understanding water flow in top down perspective
« on: March 25, 2019, 04:00:00 pm »
Something to keep in mind is that the undulating dark shapes you see on water are not shadows, they are reflections of darker elements in the environment (while the base colour tends to be a reflection of the sky). As the water surface waves, the angle of incidence on each part of the surface changes, leading to moving reflections. This is what's responsible for the separate globs of darkness.

In addition, due to the Fresnel effect, water appears less reflective the higher your viewing angle is. This means that if your tiles are from-above or typical 3/4 RPG view, there should probably not be reflections at all, or only minimal reflections, and instead we'd see through the surface of the water and into the depths.

14
Pixel Art / Re: [WIP] Underground Passage
« on: March 12, 2019, 09:30:54 pm »
Although the new bricks in the lighter area look better (they look like something rather than just noise, at least), I feel the fundamental problems haven't been addressed at all - the planes are still not well-separated (especially in the second area), and the art is still very noisy.

15
Pixel Art / Re: [Feedback][CC] Retro 90s RPG Mockup
« on: March 12, 2019, 09:28:18 pm »
You could add texture to the planks without making them into high-contrast logs, by using low-contrast colours and focusing on texture instead of trying to add shadows to flat objects.

16
Pixel Art / Re: [Feedback][CC] Retro 90s RPG Mockup
« on: March 11, 2019, 01:21:19 pm »
The background is very high-contrast, making the characters hard to see. Try keeping the values on the background surfaces to a narrower range, while interactive objects and characters keep the broader range, that way they'll be easier to distinguish.

The boards(?) and tiles on the floor feel very 3D and not flat like floors generally are, I recommend keeping shading to a minimum on flat surfaces.

Quick edit just replacing some of your floor/ground shadows and highlights with midtones from the same tiles:

I think the important parts are much easier to distinguish this way.

17
None of your images work. Twitter doesn't allow hotlinking, consider using an image hosting website such as Imgur instead.

18
General Discussion / Re: Be aware of fraudulent clients.
« on: March 07, 2019, 01:09:02 pm »
Quote from: jams0988
I've heard way more horror stories of clients getting ripped off by artists than the other way around
Artists have entire communities devoted to sharing horror stories of unpaying clients, so from the artist's perspective, scammy clients are far more common xP It's all about the people you deal with - artists usually hire other artists from a trusted network, so they don't get to meet scammy artists as much, and art clients don't usually have art clients of their own, so they don't get to meet the scammy clients. There are bad (or at least incompetent) people on all sides.

Partial upfront payment is the only way to be safe when dealing with a client you don't know, even with a contract. Contracts are important, but the costs of enforcing them are often much greater than even the full payment would've been. It's true that artists gain more from this arrangement than clients since clients would have nothing to lose to a scammy artist if there was no downpayment, but as Kiana said, clients have the luxury of disputing a payment, while artists cannot file a dispute on their wasted time.

If you want work without upfront payment, then hire people who already trust you. If there aren't any, then you'll need to built trust with them, via respecting their payment terms.

19
General Discussion / Re: Best Program for Doing Animated Tiles?
« on: March 03, 2019, 05:18:11 am »
Sadly, no ): I usually do all my tiling testing on base non-animated tiles and then animate them after. When the animation is something complex where I need to preview both tiling and animation at once, my approach in Pyxel Edit is to lay the tiles out in such a way that I can see each frame as it tiles in context, while also having the frames in a row so Pyxel Edit can animate them.

I heard someone mention using a combination of Tiled and (your image editor of choice) saving directly to the PNG that gets read in and auto-updated by Tiled, which works best if you can have the two programs side by side so you don't have to switch between them. It's nowhere near as convenient as being able to edit and preview within a single editor, but it's something.

20
Pixel Art / Re: [WIP] Underground Passage
« on: March 03, 2019, 02:45:52 am »
The bottom image is very flat, it looks like a solid flat wall rather than a room the character can stand in, because the values of the front wall and the back wall are so similar. Something more like the top image, where the back wall is darker would work better, since both the front walls (floor/ceiling) and the character stand out well against it.

The tiles feel very noisy, they give me a bit of a PS1-era look where they'd downsample photo textures. It looks lazy, to be honest ): I think these would benefit a lot from some clean-up and simplification to match the character's cartoonier style.

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