AuthorTopic: Dithering Practice (cartoon wolf)  (Read 3728 times)

Offline Ultimaodin

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Dithering Practice (cartoon wolf)

on: February 23, 2010, 05:51:34 am
Well I'm going to practice my dithering on this cartoon wolf I based off a plush toy.

I'm using this:

method of dithering.






Feel free to comment on the one part of a leg I've done so far, general shading and colours etc...


The reference picture I'm using:

http://i393.photobucket.com/albums/pp16/TheUnknownArtistJak/wolfplush.jpg


EDIT: I just realised I need to blend it more to (our) left side of the leg.

Offline Manupix

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Re: Dithering Practice (cartoon wolf)

Reply #1 on: February 23, 2010, 10:25:27 am
Interesting thread idea.
Even though I should really be doing something else, I think I have to catch it from the start.

Dithering has a heavy influence on many aspects of a piece, and has to be carefully thought out before.
It's usually thought of as a good way to soften color transitions: not so.

In this piece, you had one hard transition indicative of contrasted light, which gave a limited but strong idea of volume.
You replaced that with 6 transitions indicative of nothing, and they're no less hard to the eye, mainly because of the flatness of the planes the pattern induces.
Additionally, the way you applied these patterns is very, very noisy.
And you didn't even gain a texture for your trouble.

The subject you chose has texture: good choice, that's one thing dithering can help with, as long as you break the patterns so as to never introduce any new unwanted plane.

Try again with these points in mind, and check the effect of every single pixel on the whole piece. It's long work!

Offline Ultimaodin

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Re: Dithering Practice (cartoon wolf)

Reply #2 on: March 02, 2010, 04:32:14 am
Well to be totally honest I didn't even notice the multiple plane thing until you pointed it out and then it looked obvious as heck. It's amazing how much we see what we want to see. Having another set of eyes really helps.

So anyway I tried to study several fur/wool and hair textures and tried to create a texture using the dither technique.
Unfortunately while all the references look really good my texture came out like a tribal art reject.



Just the one leg again so far. I'm certain is a lot better but it still looks horrible to me. Am I trying to create to chunky of texture pieces.
Do I need relax the dither.
Am I not extending it enough.
Am I destroying the shadows.

I'm not sure what it is or a combination of them all but I seem to be missing something important.
Oh well I'm going to keep practicing.

EDIT: It actually looks kind of like Tiger fur now that I think about it. -_-

Offline Manupix

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Re: Dithering Practice (cartoon wolf)

Reply #3 on: March 04, 2010, 12:41:57 am
That's an interesting texture on the very tip of the paw, it gives a woolly fur idea.
The middle part is less convincing, because the texture direction (45 upward) doesn't look right.
The upper part is too noisy; checker patches are too large (flat) and isolated pixels are never a good option.

Killing the shadows: rather, just making a very different light source (soft, top-down) from that of the original sketch (hard, sideways). It could be an option too.