AuthorTopic: Tutorials?  (Read 17728 times)

Offline notoalpena

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 17
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Tutorials?

on: October 30, 2008, 06:02:59 am
I'm interested in this, I find it really cool.  :D
Anyone know of any tutorials? I'm completely new to modeling, and know nothing about it.

Offline infinity+1

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 166
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • the real deal
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #1 on: October 30, 2008, 02:41:43 pm
i'll second this. been trying out wings, and blender is confusing.

Offline TrevoriuS

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 550
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Pixels... everywhere!!
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #2 on: October 30, 2008, 05:27:52 pm
I don't know of blender, except for the fact that it frustrated the hell out of me within 5 minutes because it's interface and accessibility differs completely from what I'm used to. It's alot of basic tools you need to learn, and after that it's just pracitcing. If you get either maya or 3D studio max I can hint you on the basics.

Some sidenotes on these packages:
If you get used to maya you can easily model with it, it just lacks filters. However, no matter how used you are max you won't be able to decently animate with it :P

Yes they are not for free, no nobody will know if you have 'em legal or not as long as you don't intent to use this outside your personal space.
Remove above if inappropiate or against rules please

Offline Squiggly_P

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 66
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #3 on: October 31, 2008, 02:24:04 am
I use Blender and I've no problems with it.  Just takes a week or three to get used to the interface, which is confusing to a lot of people because it's very non-modular compared to other systems.  A lot of other apps are actually 'borrowing' a lot of ideas from Blender's interface lately (the subdivided GUI, the non-modular design, etc).  At least, that's what one guy at the Blender conference this year said.  Maybe he was onto something, but regardless, Blender works great for me.

As far as tutorials, what you want to do is look for sites and artists that specifically target low-spec systems and just look at their meshes and UV's.  I goto the polycount forums a lot just to check out the low-poly thread there (which is chock full of models that are all targeted ad DS, PSP and cell phone spec models mostly).  Lots of models with fewer than 500 tris and 128x128 or smaller textures.  Just study those guys and do a lot of practicing.  Doing low low spec stuff will really help you understand how to make the most out of the silhouette and how to really define your shapes with as little geometry as possible.

Basically, the best way to learn it is to just do it, post it up and let people rip it apart.  Lather, rinse and repeat.

Offline TrevoriuS

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 550
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Pixels... everywhere!!
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #4 on: October 31, 2008, 10:39:44 am
Being able to do good models (low poly or not) requires observations, common sense, and practice. if you go for low poly, make sure the shilouette is recognizable at all time.

Offline Luzeke

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 116
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • I draw, therefore I ink.
    • View Profile
    • inkBot

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #5 on: November 11, 2008, 08:04:55 am
If you just want to practice modeling, I'd recommend Silo.

If you don't have access to Maya or(/and) 3DS Max I personally would say it's better to stick with smaller programs which do one thing specifically. I.e. One program for modeling, another one for animation etc. Specialized programs have the benefit of giving the user better control over the programs intent. Yes Maya and 3DS Max can do virtually anything, but the price of that is that the programs UI get blotched and hard-navigated for novices. RealFlow is another specialized program which does something that can be done in Max/Maya but a zillion times better. (Although RealFlow will cost you your right arm and your firstborn to purchase. It's expensive!)

For tutorials I'd say go to www.3dbuzz.com or google.

Offline Kazuya Mochu

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 436
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • ^thx Larwick
    • View Profile
    • my portfolio website

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #6 on: November 11, 2008, 10:18:45 am
RealFlow doesnt do all that maya/max do. its a fluid generator and renderer software. it may be more expensive then max or maya, but is not as broad. its designed for a specific porpouse.
Image size doesn't matter! It's what you do with your pixels that counts!

Offline Luzeke

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 116
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • I draw, therefore I ink.
    • View Profile
    • inkBot

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #7 on: November 11, 2008, 11:33:42 am
RealFlow doesnt do all that maya/max do. its a fluid generator and renderer software. it may be more expensive then max or maya, but is not as broad. its designed for a specific porpouse.

That's exactly what I meant.

Quote from: Me
RealFlow is another specialized program which does something that can be done in Max/Maya but a zillion times better.

Now, in max you can do similar simulations that you can with realflow. But take the most complex simulation you can muster in max and do the same in realflow and it doesn't take the same processing power to do.
The definition of "broad"  varies depending on viewpoint. When comparing it to the whole of max then yes rf isn't as broad. But if you look at max's physics/fluid simulation part and compare that to rf, then rf is broader by far.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2008, 12:27:06 pm by Luzeke »

Offline Kazuya Mochu

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 436
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • ^thx Larwick
    • View Profile
    • my portfolio website

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #8 on: November 11, 2008, 08:30:49 pm
I read "does anything that can be done in max/maya"

my bad!
Image size doesn't matter! It's what you do with your pixels that counts!

Offline Luzeke

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 116
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • I draw, therefore I ink.
    • View Profile
    • inkBot

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #9 on: November 12, 2008, 07:17:06 am
That's okay!  :)

Offline Shoy

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #10 on: November 20, 2008, 11:38:02 pm
Are there any such tutorials on Texturing?
I've been loving some of the low poly work around here, but any time I try to even think about texturing, It... well, doesn't come out right.

(I'm using Blender for the sheer fact that my class IRL is too cheap to buy 3DS or Maya.)

Offline Jakten

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 250
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • The Bionic Vapor Boy
    • View Profile
    • Levitating Rocksquatch

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #11 on: November 21, 2008, 04:34:35 am
http://www.poopinmymouth.com/tutorial/tutorial.htm This guy has a bunch of tutorials, texturing and modelling. This is where I learned alot of what I know (aside from school anyways)
http://www.bakaneko.com/howto/computer/3d/character/page09.html this tutorial is also quite helpful. He uses photographs for his textures but it helps if you assume hes creating it from scratch and the unwrapping help is good.

I'm pretty sure they are using 3DS Max but from what I've seen the tools are generally the same in terms of texturing.

If you have any specific texturing questions I'm willing to help out as best I can. Hope this helps.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2008, 04:37:22 am by Jakten »

Offline TrevoriuS

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 550
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Pixels... everywhere!!
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #12 on: November 21, 2008, 09:41:10 am
Roadkill UV For all yer unwrapping. I use it for lots of stuff, very useful, also has both stand-alone application and plugin versions. Anyone that's interested, have a look. It really saves you the large effort the creator of the second tutorial above goes through :P

Offline LazyLemon

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #13 on: May 08, 2009, 06:48:36 pm
If I were you I would go for maya. It is really intuitive and you can learn the basics to modeling from their own tuts. For UV unwrapping I would go to hourences!

Offline Zerath

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #14 on: May 14, 2009, 06:22:58 pm
In my opinion, go for Blender. Why? Most of all, it's free. You can't any better price than free. Polymodelling doesn't change after all, no matter the software. If you learn how to do simple polymodelling with Blender, you can do with any software (basically you just need to learn where to find all the necessary tools). As for unwrapping, Blender is easy. Just mark the seams and press the magic button, it's mostly there. Also, I'm in love with the "snap to pixels" function in Blender's uv-view.
I also think that pretty many users in this forum use Blender, so you can find help from here. But mostly, it's free. Less trouble for everyone when you use something that is free.

Maybe a simple tutorial should be written in this very forum.

Offline Dusty

  • 0100
  • ***
  • Posts: 1107
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #15 on: May 15, 2009, 02:47:15 am
I found myself completely stumped with Blender, to the point of being discouraged with 3D modelling. Got 3ds max 7 and was able to do all kinds of stuff. Polymodelling doesn't change, but interface and userbility(?) does, and IMO Blender doesn't do that great of a job making it easy. However, this all depends on how good you are with this stuff :) Someone with past 3D experience may be able to use Blender easily, but I don't think it's very newbie-friendly.

Offline TrevoriuS

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 550
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Pixels... everywhere!!
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #16 on: May 15, 2009, 08:35:27 pm
I have a bunch of 3D experience by now and understand less than shit about blender. I just use maya, and 3dsmax, for modeling rigging and animating. Maya enables more control. but in max you need it less because it's really developed for production, and works absolutely great when modeling architectural stuff

Offline madPXL

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 123
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • PXL Crow
    • View Profile
    • madpxl.com

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #17 on: June 01, 2009, 11:58:12 pm
I come from 3ds max (1 year of modelling with it) and after 3 weeks spent to understand how the blender ui works (several tests from tutorials as mesh modeling, rigging, posing, uv mapping, rendering, etc...),
now (4 month later) I prefer 100 times blender to 3Ds max...

I will recommend those sites for anyone interested by some blender tutorials:

http://www.cgcookie.com/articles/blender
http://www.blenderguru.com


but the way to make good low poly meshes depends from your time and the good use/learn of the software.
I don't choose Blender because it's FREE, but because I'm more efficient with it :)

LODYblokady

  • Guest

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #18 on: June 02, 2009, 06:16:08 am
I have a page of XSI tutorials.
http://sourcepedia.info/FILES/tuts.html

Offline thedaemon

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 106
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • blog

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #19 on: June 17, 2009, 12:10:18 am
Lots of "bad" advice here. If you want to model, use Wings3D. It is very very powerful and has a really quick workflow. I recommend turning on advanced menu's in the preferences though. I never "got" modeling until I found Wings3D. A light bulb exploded in my head!!!!! (hehe) I haven't used it too much as I do animation mostly now (Blender). Blender is hard for newbies (it was for me) Max was easier, but really once you get 1 application, they are all the same. They just have different annoyances and "features". :)

BTW if you can find Martin Krol's Mirai modeling tutorial videos they can greatly help. He taught me how to model and his videos are great. Of course there is youtube now, maybe they are on there...

Offline TrevoriuS

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 550
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Pixels... everywhere!!
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #20 on: June 17, 2009, 08:13:44 am
So people posting tutorials around certain software packages that are easy to learn are giving worse advice then you, whom is stating Wings3D is the only awesome 3D package for starters without mentioning beginner guides or tutorials at all. Really, I started with maya and still use it, although Max is much easier for the modelling process and I can recommend you that. Problem is that maya and max have quite different workflows and tool/camera controls. I'm still being troubled getting used to 3Ds max, but I can recommend that if you're just gonna model stuff.

PS: Isn't wings mostly used for SubD modelling?

Offline rabidbaboy

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 318
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Jesus Beam!
    • View Profile

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #21 on: June 28, 2009, 06:16:02 pm
Just wanted to bump with question/s, since this looks like a good thread to ask.

I've been trying to read on it online, but everything's so technical or vague or both that I can't wrap my head around the concept/s: what, in layman's terms are diffuse maps, specular maps, bump maps, etc? And what are the differences? how are they different from texture maps?

Thanks for any reply, I've got the modelling basics down, and texturing too, I think. I just scratch my head when these terms pop up. :)
"Baboy" is Filipino for pig.

Offline dkh

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 52
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Indiana Jones and the Fountain of Youth

Re: Tutorials?

Reply #22 on: June 28, 2009, 07:02:30 pm
I've been trying to read on it online, but everything's so technical or vague or both that I can't wrap my head around the concept/s: what, in layman's terms are diffuse maps, specular maps, bump maps, etc? And what are the differences? how are they different from texture maps?

I'm a programmer so I'll tackle this from a technical point of view yet still try to be clear...

Let's begin with diffuse maps. These are your normal textures that 3d game engines have used ever since they've been around. Each pixel in the texture (often referred to as a texture pixel or texel) lets the engine know what the diffuse color of the object the texture is mapped to is. Imagine a model that is just a wall, a diffuse map would probably contain red bricks etc. If the game engine then draws the model, it will select that texture and apply that to the wall and you'll get your textured wall. Games soon wanted better lighting effects so up to games such as Half-Life and the same generation, artists would "bake" lighting details, shadows, reflections etc. into the diffuse texture, meaning they would probably add shadows to that red-brick-wall-texture to simulate a light etc. This works but with programmable graphics pipeline (via shaders), newer games now want to calculate all the lighting and shading dynamically so that, if for example a light moves, the shadows in the texture map move as well. If you bake those details into a diffuse map, it wouldn't work, the lighting would have to be static or look fake.

The other types of maps are usually telling the engine things it needs to know in order to calculate details on the fly. There are different names and methods around but let me try to cover the grounds here:

Normal maps (often called bump maps too) are these blue-purpleish textures you might have come across before (google image search otherwise). They contain information as to what the normal at a specific spot looks like. If you don't know what a normal is, educate yourself somewhere. Anyways, the normal vectors x, y and z components are stored in the image as the r, g and b channel. As you know, the r, g and b values can range from 0-255, so a normal vector pointing straight up for a flat surface would be 0,0,1 in vector components and 127,127,255 in rgb values. That's why these are so purple, because most normals there point up more or less. The engine then knows for each texel (definition above) what the normal would look like and thus it can fake shadows and lighting.

Specular maps just let the engine know how shiny a certain part of the texture is. Often these are grayscale and a brightness of 0 means that this texel isn't shiny at all, 255 means it's as shiny as can be. So you could have a wood door with a metal handle in one diffuse map and then draw a specular map where all the parts of the wood are almost black and the metal parts are white, like a mask, and, in-game, the wood wouldn't reflect specular light, the door handle would.

Hope this makes it clearer, ask again if you still have questions, I have some additional links and images I could prepare.