AuthorTopic: Demon Slayer  (Read 6705 times)

Offline ptoing

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Re: Demon Slayer

Reply #10 on: February 09, 2007, 08:40:41 pm
But the same in HUE and SATURATION.

Saturation can, but does not necessarily change. It's more than anything about hue.
There are no ugly colours, only ugly combinations of colours.

Offline MadToaster

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Re: Demon Slayer

Reply #11 on: February 10, 2007, 03:35:11 am
The way I have it figured, form reads first from contour and value.  The whole thing about hue in terms of warm/cold seems to make sense also.

I'm not sure about saturation at all though, is there any rhyme or reason as to how you can go about picking good saturation? I've seen it go all over the place in the tone progression of a lot of video game sprites. Like it will max out in the highlight, dry up and pickup towards the core then dip off again. Then in the same game on another character it might have a completely different saturation progression. They'll both look fine to me but I have no idea what principles they're using to decide.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2007, 03:39:05 am by MadToaster »

Offline Helm

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Re: Demon Slayer

Reply #12 on: February 10, 2007, 03:40:04 am
shadows are less saturated usually, highlights in natural light are more. It's all about what the lightsource is, and what the material is.

Read and absorb: http://www.itchstudios.com/psg/art_tut.htm

Offline Ryumaru

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Re: Demon Slayer

Reply #13 on: February 10, 2007, 05:28:30 am
on saturation, i usually up the saturation in the shadows because it can bring out the sprite from the bg more and just as well imo as a black outline.

Offline Rox

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Re: Demon Slayer

Reply #14 on: February 10, 2007, 11:14:05 am
on saturation, i usually up the saturation in the shadows because it can bring out the sprite from the bg more and just as well imo as a black outline.
Same here. It's not really "right", but a more saturated color looks darker to the eye, so I tend to up the saturation on things like dark blue shades.

Offline Helm

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Re: Demon Slayer

Reply #15 on: February 10, 2007, 04:36:56 pm
It's common enough, I do it. The darkest shade before black usually is very high sat for me, but that's just a spriting trick. Madtoaster should learn color theory and he'll end up finding little tricks that work for him specifically anyway.

Offline MadToaster

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Re: Demon Slayer

Reply #16 on: February 10, 2007, 05:34:09 pm
Yeah, I agree with you completely about doing your fundamentals first. There was a period of time where I was doing nothing but gesture and figure study. I think the best thing I took from it is how likeness is more in the big shapes and proportions than tight details.

But color is so strange I've found a ton of books that will talk for pages about contour drawing, perspective, chiaroscuro and such but then their discussion of color theory all goes like this.

1.  color wheel
2. ???
3. profit

Thanks for that link to Prom's tutorial. I didn't know he was so focused on theory like this. good stuff. :D

Offline Helm

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Re: Demon Slayer

Reply #17 on: February 10, 2007, 05:38:52 pm
1.  color wheel
2. ???
3. profit

I know exactly what you mean. There's lots of schools in terms of color theory though. Might want to look into impressionist and expressionist art history for schemes of coloring that were based on highly scientifically arbiterate theories, but provided for interesting art nonetheless.