AuthorTopic: Understanding water flow in top down perspective  (Read 1169 times)

Offline Beetleking22

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Re: Understanding water flow in top down perspective

Reply #10 on: March 25, 2019, 06:50:52 pm


In addition, due to the Fresnel effect, water appears less reflective the higher your viewing angle is. This means that if your tiles are from-above or typical 3/4 RPG view, there should probably not be reflections at all, or only minimal reflections, and instead we'd see through the surface of the water and into the depths.

This is not 3/4 perspective but it still have reflection from trees from top down view... So If there is more stuff near by the pond.. Should it reflect other stuff like Tree etc?

« Last Edit: March 25, 2019, 07:51:44 pm by Beetleking22 »

Offline Beetleking22

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Re: Understanding water flow in top down perspective

Reply #11 on: March 25, 2019, 09:46:31 pm
I did this very quickly..each side has just 1 frame so it does not look very solid.. but I wanted to test how the flow look with Three sides.. The reflection are also more thinner now.. I think it fits better.

Offline eishiya

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Re: Understanding water flow in top down perspective

Reply #12 on: March 25, 2019, 09:52:35 pm


In addition, due to the Fresnel effect, water appears less reflective the higher your viewing angle is. This means that if your tiles are from-above or typical 3/4 RPG view, there should probably not be reflections at all, or only minimal reflections, and instead we'd see through the surface of the water and into the depths.

This is not 3/4 perspective but it still have reflection from trees from top down view... So If there is more stuff near by the pond.. Should it reflect other stuff like Tree etc?

https://i.imgur.com/iAYFRQU.png
In that image, it's not reflections but shadows, which would only change a little bit as the water moved. The reflections in that image are very faint, and notice how you can see through the (murky!) water a little near the sides due to the angle.

Offline Beetleking22

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Re: Understanding water flow in top down perspective

Reply #13 on: March 25, 2019, 11:09:45 pm


In addition, due to the Fresnel effect, water appears less reflective the higher your viewing angle is. This means that if your tiles are from-above or typical 3/4 RPG view, there should probably not be reflections at all, or only minimal reflections, and instead we'd see through the surface of the water and into the depths.

This is not 3/4 perspective but it still have reflection from trees from top down view... So If there is more stuff near by the pond.. Should it reflect other stuff like Tree etc?

https://i.imgur.com/iAYFRQU.png
In that image, it's not reflections but shadows, which would only change a little bit as the water moved. The reflections in that image are very faint, and notice how you can see through the (murky!) water a little near the sides due to the angle.

Yeah I see that. So is this movement flow pretty much unnecessary and unrealistic?

Offline eishiya

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Re: Understanding water flow in top down perspective

Reply #14 on: March 25, 2019, 11:23:46 pm
The way you're thinking about it currently-yes. Sinusoidal deformations occur in 3D rather than 2D, and the resulting effects on reflections do not resemble sine waves (due to their shapes being determined by the angles of incidence and therefore being only indirectly influenced by the wave motion), so it doesn't make much sense to draw them as such.

If you want to understand water in a mathematical way, then you'd need to work in 3D, as 2D necessarily obscures some important information. If you want to learn how to draw good-looking 2D water, then you shouldn't worry too much about the mathematics and focus on observing the effects, spend time looking at water (ideally, in real life so you can change your viewing angle, mess with the water surface, etc, but videos can be helpful too). Try animating some non-looping water from reference, at various angles and with various kinds of waves. You can always make it loop later once you have a better feel for how it works. Just as with walk cycles, billowing clothing, etc, IRL there aren't perfect loops for most natural things, but we animators always find a way to make it work by fudging the details :]
« Last Edit: March 26, 2019, 02:42:15 am by eishiya »

Offline Beetleking22

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Re: Understanding water flow in top down perspective

Reply #15 on: March 26, 2019, 12:39:34 am
The way you're thinking about it currently-yes. Sinusoidal deformations occur in 3D rather than 2D, and the resulting effects on reflections do not resemble sine waves (due to their shapes being determined by the angles of incidence and therefore being only indirectly influenced by the wave motion), so it doesn't make much sense to draw them as such.

If you want to understand water in a mathematical way, then you'd need to work in 3D, as 2D necessarily obscures some important information. If you want to learn how to draw good-looking 2D water, then you shouldn't worry too much about the mathematics and focus on observing the effects, spend time looking at water (ideally, in real life so you can change your viewing angle, mess with the water surface, etc, but videos can be helpful too). Try animating some non-looping water from reference, at various angles and with various kinds of waves. You can always make it loop later once you have a better feel for how it works. Just as with walk cycles, billowing clothing, etc, IRL there aren't perfect loops for most natural things, but we animators always find a way to make it work by judging the details :]

Thank you for information...I really mean it.  Animating the water itself arent problem for me.. I would be happy if I can do the water animation without  2 pixel duplication movement.. This is the problem.Its really pain in ass animate when you need also duplicate 2 pixel  when you have like 8 different frames that also move.  So im  relieved that I was doing it wrong    :P.. I have done wave animation before but I never moved them like I did this time.





« Last Edit: March 26, 2019, 12:47:06 am by Beetleking22 »