AuthorTopic: Tutorial to draw Walking Avatars  (Read 6000 times)

Offline Donar

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Re: Tutorial to draw Walking Avatars

Reply #10 on: July 22, 2007, 04:05:13 pm
Thanks to you all for taking your time with commenting the article (especially Conceit for constructive criticism).

However, I'd like to briefly address exactly Conceit's statement about "do this more effortlessly, using instinct instead of rationale".

Assume you were to do such  a series, say, 20 different female characters. Of course one can go and do all the designs 20 times, or one can attempt to reuse certain "components", just slightly modifing diameters, lenghts etc., ithout caring too much for angles (which still should be ok for later characters when the frst one is). - Don't get me wrong: I do /not/ criticise your critics (en contraire!). I just want to point out, that the "purely artistic approach" might be too time-consuming when compared to a "semi-automatic design" approach. - The latter has the potentital to get you somewhere within a "useful time". The former, however, definitely will look better, if an artist is at work ;)

No offences intended. - Thanks again for all your comments, the /are/ appreciated.

Regards
//Donar

Offline sir-knight

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Re: Tutorial to draw Walking Avatars

Reply #11 on: July 23, 2007, 02:31:06 pm
there's no forward momentum in the body (hips and shoulder movement) also when we walk, it's a process of initiating a controlled fall that we catch with our moving legs.

When we walk, our heads will dip forward just a tiny bit on the impact of the leading foot, there is not just up and down motion, but slight forward falling and straightening as we catch ourselves, in most simple sprite animation, a lot of this is not captured because of insufficient pixels or strange use of style/proportions. Because you are drawing something more realistic, you need to emulate life more.

In addition to the forward falling of the head, the hips will also move forward just a bit to catch the fall, what you've got in your animation is a straight up and down motion, and I can see the legs in the figure growing longer to impact, it's giving it sort of a piston effect. Rotation of the hips will compensate a little but movement of the upper body in reaction to the change in balance is what will eliminate the weird look.