AuthorTopic: background sizes and time to finish  (Read 905 times)

Offline megaoy

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background sizes and time to finish

on: April 09, 2018, 02:07:15 pm
hey guys i'm new to pixel art so wanna know what sizes for backgrounds(single image), what is small, a medium and big background, and if possible tell the estimate time to complete them
« Last Edit: April 11, 2018, 02:19:20 pm by megaoy »

Offline nvision

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Re: background sizes and time to finish

Reply #1 on: April 11, 2018, 01:09:11 pm
This is extremely subjective and really depends on what platform you're targeting and whether you're creating splash images for backgrounds (a single bespoke image) or a tiled background (made up of many smaller, reusable pieces). Size will largely be determined by your screen resolution, and time by your level of expertise.  If you have more specifics it would be easier to help with a general estimate.

Offline megaoy

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Re: background sizes and time to finish

Reply #2 on: April 11, 2018, 02:18:38 pm
i would say i single image, i remember i saw a guy saying 256x256 pixels was size of small background

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Re: background sizes and time to finish

Reply #3 on: April 12, 2018, 08:33:47 am
I'd say single-screen sizes of old computers would be considered small-medium. GBC at 160144 would be a good example of something small. Medium size for me would be GBA at 240160, and 80s/90s desktops. ZX Spectrum 256192 up to DOS/Amiga 320240. Anything much bigger than that, so backgrounds that span multiple screens, and I'd say it's large.

Time estimates really depend. Let me give you some examples for myself (I feel I work quite slow).

You could do a chicken-scratch painting or concept art in 2h (a style that's often not technically pixelart anymore). 300160:


Same with using things like HD index painting that does dithering and anti-aliasing automatically, you can do the same size image in 2-3h. 340192:


This is more a lo-res digital painting, than pixel art. But Dan Fessler has better examples that are more pixel art-ish.

A simple, but manually (semi-)cleaned up background goes to 10h. 320160:


But what really matters is how many details there are (what I call 'density' of the image). Here's a bigger scene that took in the ballpark of 50h. I optimize speed of dithering using my own technique with layers. 512192:


And finally, this is not really a background anymore, but a good example of extreme density (while also being a big canvas to begin with). Took 200h. 540382:


So as you can see, the range is all over the place and due to density of details and amount of cleanup, has less to do with canvas size than subject/style. And certain optimization techniques (plus your experience) again influence the time.

Offline GlenBrown

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Re: background sizes and time to finish

Reply #4 on: September 10, 2018, 06:39:39 pm
I'd say single-screen sizes of old computers would be considered small-medium. GBC at 160144 would be a good example of something small. Medium size for me would be GBA at 240160, and 80s/90s desktops. ZX Spectrum 256192 up to DOS/Amiga 320240. Anything much bigger than found this review that, so backgrounds that span multiple screens, and I'd say it's large.

Time estimates really depend. Let me give you some examples for myself (I feel I work quite slow).

You could do a chicken-scratch painting or concept art in 2h (a style that's often not technically pixelart anymore). 300160:


Same with using things like HD index painting that does dithering and anti-aliasing automatically, you can do the same size image in 2-3h. 340192:


This is more a lo-res digital painting, than pixel art. But Dan Fessler has better examples that are more pixel art-ish.

A simple, but manually (semi-)cleaned up background goes to 10h. 320160:


But what really matters is how many details there are (what I call 'density' of the image). Here's a bigger scene that took in the ballpark of 50h. I optimize speed of dithering using my own technique with layers. 512192:


And finally, this is not really a background anymore, but a good example of extreme density (while also being a big canvas to begin with). Took 200h. 540382:


So as you can see, the range is all over the place and due to density of details and amount of cleanup, has less to do with canvas size than subject/style. And certain optimization techniques (plus your experience) again influence the time.

Though it consume some time but I must appreciate you effort in it and it look so clean and clear to me.
Great work buddy.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2019, 08:36:09 pm by GlenBrown »

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Re: background sizes and time to finish

Reply #5 on: September 11, 2018, 11:59:21 am
Thanks, they are a lot of fun to do. Also relaxing, I watch many TV shows in the long hours this takes to make.