AuthorTopic: Lava tips  (Read 3243 times)

Offline neomerlin

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Re: Lava tips

Reply #10 on: August 29, 2017, 07:56:34 am
I don't have nearly the artistic skills to actually offer advice to you on this, but I do think your bear is adorable and your lava is looking better and more lava-ish with each revision. Keep trying! You're doing great!
Author, martial artist, movie buff, tabletop gamer, pixel enthusiast.
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Offline Bearbear65

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Re: Lava tips

Reply #11 on: August 29, 2017, 09:31:30 am
I don't have nearly the artistic skills to actually offer advice to you on this, but I do think your bear is adorable and your lava is looking better and more lava-ish with each revision. Keep trying! You're doing great!
Thanks you  :)

Offline Bearbear65

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Re: Lava tips

Reply #12 on: August 29, 2017, 10:14:03 am
The bear looked a bit hot anyways so... I thought of trying out other stuff too
I tried to put a thermal suit but the problem was that thermal suits looks a little wrinkled up
And I tried to make the on the bear but how much times I try it just looks like gray camo



Is there any advice to make all of these details in pixel art without overdoing it like my first lava I posted
« Last Edit: August 29, 2017, 10:16:53 am by Bearbear65 »

Offline eishiya

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Re: Lava tips

Reply #13 on: August 29, 2017, 01:00:12 pm
Lava's looking way better!

My suggestion with the thermal suit is to not underestimate the human brain's ability to fill in missing details. Suggesting just a few folds instead of keeping the whole thing perfect will read as "ooh, wrinkly".

Here are a couple of edits, one to make the bear look more like he's lit by the lava, and another adding a themal suit, to show how you can make it look pretty wrinkly without losing the sense of light/shadow/form:

I also tweaked the lava colours a little and made a few minor changes. The biggest change was to remove the yellow lava bits from the bottom spill, this makes the lava look more like it's cooling down, which I think is appropriate given how thick it is compared to how thin it is at the top. I cleaned up some bits that felt a little noisy - big, stringy clusters give more sense of flow.
While editing, I noticed the container only has three feet xP Didn't fix that.

I recommend not working on a white background. Use a background colour that represents the general feel of the scene, even if you're not going to be drawing the entire scene. It'll make it easier to pick colours and values. White drowns everything out and makes it hard to see if your values are any good, as everything looks very dark compared to white.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2017, 01:04:58 pm by eishiya »

Offline Bearbear65

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Re: Lava tips

Reply #14 on: August 30, 2017, 12:11:21 pm
Lava's looking way better!

My suggestion with the thermal suit is to not underestimate the human brain's ability to fill in missing details. Suggesting just a few folds instead of keeping the whole thing perfect will read as "ooh, wrinkly".

Here are a couple of edits, one to make the bear look more like he's lit by the lava, and another adding a themal suit, to show how you can make it look pretty wrinkly without losing the sense of light/shadow/form:

I also tweaked the lava colours a little and made a few minor changes. The biggest change was to remove the yellow lava bits from the bottom spill, this makes the lava look more like it's cooling down, which I think is appropriate given how thick it is compared to how thin it is at the top. I cleaned up some bits that felt a little noisy - big, stringy clusters give more sense of flow.
While editing, I noticed the container only has three feet xP Didn't fix that.

I recommend not working on a white background. Use a background colour that represents the general feel of the scene, even if you're not going to be drawing the entire scene. It'll make it easier to pick colours and values. White drowns everything out and makes it hard to see if your values are any good, as everything looks very dark compared to white.
Thank you so much for the advice  :)
For example I'll use red or orange for the back ground for the lava pic
And I didn't realize the leg too I need to look more into details too
And I agree with the things Layers of lava and also thanks for the thermal suit
It looks nice and simple I tried to make light (bright) lines then put dark lines underneath them
I'll compare the image and your art and see what you have done and where to put the dark parts and stuff

Anyways thanks for your support I'll try to improve my art
And might (definitely) come back for more tips  :)

Offline eishiya

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Re: Lava tips

Reply #15 on: August 30, 2017, 01:10:54 pm
The way I approached the folds was this:
1. Start off with the basic form of the suit (I just recoloured the bear and added the rim on the helmet, using the lightest and darkest colours)
2. Soften up the shadows a bit with the mid-blue, since the original two colours were too harsh
3. Break up the boundaries between the colours with small "foldy" shapes, keeping them from reaching into bands of other colours, since the folds aren't meant to be very deep.
4. Add small details, namely the lines on the front of the jacket.

Step 3, breaking up the boundaries to create an appearance of detail is basically my standard approach to adding detail without overpowering the important parts. It helps make sure the details don't break up the major colour areas that create the sense of form. It's enough to just show the folds as they affect the colour boundaries, and the human brain fills in the missing details. Large continuous features, like the upper edge of the bulging rim on the helmet, read just because the drawn features align, even though they don't touch.