AuthorTopic: anatomy attempt #1 (c+c)  (Read 2814 times)

Offline Friend

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anatomy attempt #1 (c+c)

on: March 09, 2015, 03:29:08 pm
The description reads young sexy muscular male model in underwear against white wall... ha  :blind:

anyway, right now I'm struggling with understanding how the left arm works with it bent so high up.  I can't visualize the skeleton underneath.  Also, there's bound to be a huge number of errors since this is my first try in anatomy.  I tried to visualize the skeleton like how Night showed in his awesome edit in datmuffinman's thread.   (thanks Night)

gave the arm a shot and tweaked everything else.  not sure i understood the joints right, especially in the shoulders.






« Last Edit: March 09, 2015, 08:27:22 pm by Friend »

Offline 32

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Re: anatomy attempt #1 (c+c)

Reply #1 on: March 09, 2015, 10:25:11 pm
Good observations so far. He looks a little off balance, pull the torso over to the left a few pixels and it should help. The shoulder socket is held in place between the clavicle on the front and the scapula on the back, each of these can slide up and down over the rib cage. You have it drawn like there's bones that come out of the scapula but this isn't the case. I would guess the ball of his humerus would be somewhere behind the top of his armpit.

Offline Night

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Re: anatomy attempt #1 (c+c)

Reply #2 on: March 10, 2015, 02:05:22 pm
I tried to visualize the skeleton like how Night showed in his awesome edit in datmuffinman's thread.   (thanks Night)
You're welcome.  ;D
Learning the skeleton is a huge first step in learning anatomy and building a figure without reference; so I'm glad to see that (I'd suggest you study the skeleton carefully, piece by piece, to get a greater understanding of what its structure is like.

In regards to the connection of the arm at that point; forgive me if you already knew this, it's a little hard to tell from the sketch, but the humerus (upper arm bone) connects only to the scapula and does not ever touch the clavicle (the scapula does connect to the clavicle, though).

On a side-note, the pelvis in men tends to be longer and narrower than in women.

Here's an edit like the one in the other thread, maybe it will give you some insight.
There is light at the end of the tunnel.

Offline Friend

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Re: anatomy attempt #1 (c+c)

Reply #3 on: March 10, 2015, 02:33:15 pm
I tried to visualize the skeleton like how Night showed in his awesome edit in datmuffinman's thread.   (thanks Night)
You're welcome.  ;D
Learning the skeleton is a huge first step in learning anatomy and building a figure without reference; so I'm glad to see that (I'd suggest you study the skeleton carefully, piece by piece, to get a greater understanding of what its structure is like.

In regards to the connection of the arm at that point; forgive me if you already knew this, it's a little hard to tell from the sketch, but the humerus (upper arm bone) connects only to the scapula and does not ever touch the clavicle (the scapula does connect to the clavicle, though).

On a side-note, the pelvis in men tends to be longer and narrower than in women.

Here's an edit like the one in the other thread, maybe it will give you some insight.



@32, thank you  ;D^_^ I understand the shoulder area better, and the balance issue is also really helpful.   :)

@Night ffffffffffffff thank you isn't enough :D   I'm also glad that I had somewhat the right idea in a few areas.  I just need to fill in the mysteries and complexities so there's no ambiguity.  This is really hard for me since I have a very weak grasp on drawing structure and perspective but I think the skeleton is good practice there as well. 

Explaining how the humerus doesn't connect to the clavicle really helps.  the scapula clavicle and humerus all link at the ball joint, but i need to pay attention to what actually attaches to what.

I'm impressed how both of you could pinpoint issues that are admittedly hard to see in a crude sketch.  Thanks again. Will work hard to improve it.

I've decided a thing that is hindering my progress is spending too much time on detail, detail that is placed on top of gaps in my knowledge.  I've decided to simplify for the time being, so that i can build on top of a better foundation.  I'll probably keep redrawing him over and over until I can get the balance, forms, and joints and simplified anatomy to a stronger level. 

« Last Edit: March 10, 2015, 07:11:05 pm by Friend »

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Re: anatomy attempt #1 (c+c)

Reply #4 on: March 12, 2015, 05:15:22 pm
I revamped my approach.  I learned how to draw gesture to get the correct feel of the pose rather than focusing on contour.

Once I got the correct feel of the pose, I tried to make the anatomy proportionate.  Then I tried to give basic details of the forms of the muscles.  Now it is time I think to study more the skeleton and the muscles to get the correct details of the body.

Does anyone find that I'm doing better, or am I doing something off?  To me it seems like a good improvement.   :hehe:
Only thing is, I didn't use the skeleton at all?????  I'm worried I'm doing something significantly wrong :(  Or should I now try to do a skeleton underneath and then tweak everything according to what the skeleton reveals??





« Last Edit: March 13, 2015, 12:22:27 am by Friend »

Offline cels

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Re: anatomy attempt #1 (c+c)

Reply #5 on: March 12, 2015, 07:30:56 pm


In my opinion, pixel art is an easy way to learn certain kind of objects and motifs and an incredibly difficult way to learn others. If I could go back in time and offer myself some advice, I would tell myself that learning anatomy by doing pixel art is like learning how to shoot a gun by doing biathlon. Maybe others will disagree, but I personally felt I've learned a hundred times more from doing anatomy sketches with pencil and paper. Pixel art is just such a brutal medium when it comes to anatomy, very unforgiving. And at this scale, there's so much work in just rendering it, once you have the basic shape right!

Anyway, I can't help much with C&C, I'm afraid. I'll leave it to the good artists. But his right leg (especially his right knee) seems to have the wrong angle, as if pointing towards the viewer instead of outwards towards his right.

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Re: anatomy attempt #1 (c+c)

Reply #6 on: March 13, 2015, 12:27:14 am
thanks cels :) 

I know about not learning art through pixel art, but I say meh.   :yell:  I actually sketched him out on paper first :) I didnt scan it or anything.  I just practiced it on paper before trying it digitally.

About the knees, thanks, I was being careless.  I wouldnt even have noticed, since once I chunked in some forms it resolved somewhat, but you made me see how weak the legs are.  I'll redo them.

And   ??? ??? ???  You're an awesome artist.  I've been a fan of your work since when I used to be frost butt

Offline StarRaven

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Re: anatomy attempt #1 (c+c)

Reply #7 on: March 13, 2015, 03:22:35 am
Hi! One quick thing about the legs/balance: when a person puts their weight on one foot, that foot should fall directly below their center of gravity.  On most men, it's near the waist; for women, a little lower. This is why your guy looks unbalanced: notice on the reference how that leg comes inward to hold up the weight of his body, since the other leg is over there doing minimal work that slacker.

I scribbled this:


I've also noticed that the angle of the shoulders and the angle of the hips tend to kind of offset each other.

Also also it's okay not to start from the skeleton. I tend to really stretch everything out if I do that, so I kind of work from bubbles and boxes. Gotta find the method that works best for you!
« Last Edit: March 13, 2015, 03:24:49 am by StarRaven »