AuthorTopic: Game Developement  (Read 20086 times)

Offline PixelPiledriver

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Game Developement

on: January 19, 2013, 10:40:23 am
« Last Edit: April 17, 2013, 05:00:21 pm by Crow »
And knowing that it is, we seek what it is... ~ Aristotle, Posterior Analytics, Chapter 1

Offline Crow

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #1 on: January 19, 2013, 10:54:15 am
A couple words about Python: 3.x is out, but 2.7 is still being widely used, as a lot of libraries/code was initially written for 2.x, and 3.x introduced some basic syntax changes. If you plan on using Python (for anything, really; not just games), check out beforehand if any libraries you need actually work with the version you're planning on using.

Also, check this out for the most important changes from 2.x to 3.x.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2013, 11:00:19 am by Crow »
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Offline Ashbad

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #2 on: January 19, 2013, 07:28:40 pm
No SDL or SFML?  :o http://www.libsdl.org/ http://www.sfml-dev.org/  They're two wonderful multimedia layers that work excellently with OpenGL-based code.

Also, I think that it's a bit unnecessary to include Assembly in the list of programming languages; at the least, it shouldn't be at the top of the list.  Its use is definitely necessary on simple platforms where handwritten Assembly greatly outperforms anything that a C compiler could ever produce; it's also helpful for speed-critical operations and the rare times you'll need extreme control over hardware (though on most modern x86-based machines this isn't usually possible anyways.)  However, 99.999% of the time when you're writing a game in C[++], a modern compiler will generally produce much better machine-level code than someone could hand-write.  Even on devices such as smartphones that have an OS that don't often allow decent use of peripherals like FPUs (especially with older Android-based phones), dipping into native code gives a bit of overhead (like with JNI) that makes random integration of native code a bit useless.  Not only does putting it at the top make it seem like it's an everyday-essential in the Game Dev world, it also may make people who click it first look at all of this with a "OHHELLNO" reaction, since I think it's agreeable that Assembly is not a comfortable first-dive into the world of Computer Science and programming  :lol:

I like the addition of Trello into the list of management tools; I've used it a lot for various projects and it's been extremely helpful for keeping ideas in check.  Notepad++ is also another good list item; as for something to add, Netbeans ( http://netbeans.org/ ) is what I use for larger projects as an IDE.

Since people may want to take on the task of creating some music for their games, perhaps add a list of some programs that make it possible?  If you choose to, I'd put a disclaimer explaining that creating music is like creating visual art and both take a lot of practice and learning.  As for what you could put on the list, https://www.ableton.com/ http://lmms.sourceforge.net/ http://famitracker.com/ http://openmpt.org/ http://www.image-line.com/documents/flstudio.html are some things you could put for starters.

It was a great idea to make this topic, for those who don't know anything about game development and want to learn all of the aspects needed! :y:

EDIT:

Searched around for some more material to be added.

OpenAL -- http://connect.creativelabs.com/openal/default.aspx
LWJGL -- http://www.lwjgl.org/ (Basically a wrapper to OpenGL/AL/CL for Java)
Panda3D -- http://www.panda3d.org/ (Haven't used but heard good things)
« Last Edit: January 19, 2013, 09:11:05 pm by Ashbad »

Offline Seiseki

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #3 on: January 19, 2013, 07:55:57 pm
This should be in here somewhere: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fy0aCDmgnxg

Offline Lachie Dazdarian

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #4 on: January 19, 2013, 11:41:49 pm
Yeah, seen that video earlier. Excellent stuff. Many programmers ignore the need to polish their games...or which is usually the case with them...interactive toys.

I use FreeBASIC for programming, atm. I think its built-in graphics library is the best thing ever for rapid development of 2D games, if you still want to stick to using a programming language and not a game making tool. But then again, I might be biased here.

I agree with Ashbad here, you should add a category for music.
FMOD - a popular 3rd party lib for playing audio in your programs
Fruity Loops Studio - great stuff for producing music on your PC
Audacity - great little utility for fast cropping, cutting and simple editing of sound files

Offline yaomon17

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #5 on: January 20, 2013, 12:09:17 am
Construct 2 is a good HTML5 engine.

Offline PixelPiledriver

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #6 on: January 20, 2013, 02:43:03 am
Thanks for contributions guys.
Exactly the kind of stuff this needs.
Yes I forgot sound.  :blind:

Quote
Also, I think that it's a bit unnecessary to include Assembly in the list of programming languages; at the least, it shouldn't be at the top of the list.
The fact that you can correctly describe Assembly's advantages and disadvantages tells me you are thorough.
No doubt this has made you a better programmer.
It's an important language to be aware of.
Programming for the Windows Console is equally unnecessary, but a good challenge and lots of fun.
I'm not trying to disagree with you, because you're right, having Assembly as the first link isn't great.  :lol:
Things will get shifted around.
Right now this thread is just a pile of links.
What it really needs is several different recommended sequences based on what people are looking to do.
And knowing that it is, we seek what it is... ~ Aristotle, Posterior Analytics, Chapter 1

Offline Ashbad

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #7 on: January 20, 2013, 03:12:20 am
The fact that you can correctly describe Assembly's advantages and disadvantages tells me you are thorough.
No doubt this has made you a better programmer.
It's an important language to be aware of.
Programming for the Windows Console is equally unnecessary, but a good challenge and lots of fun.
I'm not trying to disagree with you, because you're right, having Assembly as the first link isn't great.  :lol:
Things will get shifted around.
Right now this thread is just a pile of links.
What it really needs is several different recommended sequences based on what people are looking to do.

Good point, I guess this is basically just a list of everything at this point, until it's figured out what the best way to organize things is :)  Again, this was really an awesome idea, and I'm sure that it'll be a really helpful resource for people who are interested.

Here's a few more resources that may be really helpful:

http://www.lazyfoo.net/SDL_tutorials/ -- A SDL tutorial aimed at people who already know C[++]; teaches everything from setting up SDL to work with one's work environment and the basics of SDL to interfacing with OpenGL and using complementary SDL libraries like SDL_Mixer and such.

http://alleg.sourceforge.net/ -- Allegro, a game library like SDL and SFML.

http://www.loomsoft.net/resources/alltut/alltut_index.htm -- Tutorial to go with Allegro

http://www.cprogramming.com/ -- Probs one of the easiest to follow, online C learning guides there is; it's usually the one I guide people to look at on tech forums when they have no idea what they're doing, and with it they usually hit the ground running.

http://www.glprogramming.com/red/  -- An old but useful version of the OpenGL Red Book

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/  -- The Java tutorials, which are pretty decent in covering the basics of Object Orientation and Java as a language.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/centrum-xna.aspx -- XNA for .NET game dev

http://rbwhitaker.wikidot.com/xna-tutorials -- Good C# and .NET/XNA tutorials

More to follow later when I'm less tired and can think of more good resources.  :)

Offline Ymedron

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #8 on: January 20, 2013, 04:55:25 am
I've had this youtube channel in my references-folder forever...
http://www.youtube.com/user/thenewboston/videos?view=1 Im not sure if it was linked to before, or if it's actually relevant enough? There are playlists on programming but I haven't checked whether they are actually good.
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Offline PixelPiledriver

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #9 on: January 20, 2013, 08:10:23 am
Thanks added.
I skimmed about 10 of the java game dev videos.
They seemed decent enough.
He explains what he's doing and covers important topics.
If you're a total beginner and wanting to go the code route, as apposed to something like RPG maker, start out with the code academy link or something similar.
Learn the basics and building your first game engine will make a lot more sense.

Ashbad, ill float your links to the top in the morning.
Some re organizing needs to be done to accommodate multiple links per topic.
I figured that would happen quickly.
If you've got more keep em coming.

For others out there, no question is too simple.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 08:57:05 am by PixelPiledriver »
And knowing that it is, we seek what it is... ~ Aristotle, Posterior Analytics, Chapter 1

Offline Crow

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #10 on: January 20, 2013, 10:29:00 am
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Offline Ymedron

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #11 on: January 20, 2013, 10:52:16 am
Regarding the motivated-link... Someone in the comments said this:

“If you want to be a games programmer then just answer this one question. Imagine someone said you couldn’t make another game again. Would you be able to carry on living? Could you imagine yourself living a happy life in which you did no game development whatsoever? If the answer is no, then you’ll be just fine – but the answer has to be no.”

Is there anything one can do to gain this level of motivation? :c It kind of makes me wonder whether I should even try when I don't feel any kind of passion for it. Or anything else save drawing for that matter.
Also my art tumblr: ymedronart.tumblr.com

Offline Crow

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #12 on: January 20, 2013, 11:47:26 am
Just do it! Nothing can go wrong. You don't even have to finish said game, and you'll be having a lot of fun on the way regardless, and possibly also learn a lot. It's not the destination that counts, it's the journey.
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Offline Ymedron

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #13 on: January 20, 2013, 11:50:29 am
Suppose so - I guess I need to continue the code academy courses first.  :sry:
It still seems really amazing that you could code stuff like minecraft on javascript, but perhaps it's not as magical as it looks like!
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Offline Crow

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #14 on: January 20, 2013, 01:06:52 pm
Don't mix up Java and JavaScript, they're not related. Minecraft was written in Java, which - by now - is rather powerful.
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Offline Charlieton

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #15 on: January 20, 2013, 03:23:30 pm
Yeah, I don't think you should grant that comment any value. It just comes across to me as elitist and exclusionary. It also seems to contradict itself: it poses the question of whether you want to be a game programmer, in a way you would ask a person with little to no prior experience in the field. It then proceeds to ask whether you could live without making another game, "again", thus implying that you already have gone through the process of making a game. If you have already made a game, then by defintion you already are in the business of making games. Thus, asking whether you want "to be a games programmer" is redundant.

However, though clumsily executed, the point seems to be that if you are going to be a game programmer, it has to be your life blood and the thought of ever giving it up is crippling and devastating to you. Essentially, without it you no longer have any meaning in life. Now, THAT is a horrible thing to demand out of anyone about anything! And when it's applied to a novice in any particular field, it is especially cruel and counter-intuitive. The road to creating your first game - or anything, really - can be wrought with hardships and unpleasantries, only to be followed up with what might be, at best, a mediocre product. A product that offers you, the creator, no satisfaction at all, save from the fact that you're finally done and don't have to put up with it anymore. If that has been your only experience so far, then the answer is YES, you think you will be able to go on living without ever wanting to do it again. Thus, by the logic of that comment, you are disqualified from making games. And that is simply not true.

Instead, I would recommend people to take some cues from Tommy Refenes and his thoughts on making games. Motivate yourself by believing in what you are creating. Take small steps, so you don't have to wait long until you can see progress being made. And if at first it simply doesn't work out, don't let it discourage you. Because...
You don't even have to finish said game, and you'll be having a lot of fun on the way regardless, and possibly also learn a lot. It's not the destination that counts, it's the journey.

I'm also working my way through Codecademy, Javascript at the moment :P. Very pedagogic stuff! I don't know yet how far along the course of programming my own stuff it will take me, but it's doing a good job of introducing the basics so far.

Great thread!
Det skulle vara lätt för mig att säga att jag inte gillar dig, men det gör jag; tror jag

Offline Ymedron

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #16 on: January 20, 2013, 04:16:35 pm
Thank you, Crow, Charlieton. (and Pixelpiledriver for writing this topic, of course! Its easy to forget to thank people..!)

At first I didn't want to ask about the differences of Java and Javascript since I was worried we were derailing the topic, but I guess it has to do with game development..! Why are these two separate, and what use is learning javascript (other than it being beginner friendly?)

Also that analysis of the quote really helped me put my doubts to bed. I've worried the same about making comics as well (as with everything else, it's hard to start doing) but it really makes more sense to think that if you haven't tried, you won't know if it is for you. And even if you have, gaining the motivation to go past the initial phase is not set by fate or your genes. It's just about... Motivation.
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Offline Crow

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #17 on: January 20, 2013, 04:27:10 pm
Let's try briefly outlining some differences between Java and JavaScript.

JavaScript is used for clientside scripting on Websites, and pretty much nowhere else. That image zooming script on here? It's JavaScript. That's the purpose JS serves, and in that regard, it is not even its own language. It's a form of ECMAScript.

Java is actually a programming language (JavaScript ist a scripting language), and, therefore, has a way lower level than JavaScript (lower meaning closer to the hardware/architecture of your/a computer; Assembly is pretty damn low). It's not tailored for web stuff at all (but can be run using an applet anyway; not recommended), but rather can be used to do pretty much everything. From simple to complex tasks, typical applications to games and the like: you can do it with Java. It runs in it's own virtual machine, the Java virtual machine (JVM), which makes it a good choice for cross-platform applications/games, as the code can be used on all three major operating systems without many changes. The JVM is also a reason that it's sometimes not as efficient as other languages, however. There are many people you can get into an argument about with that, though, so let's not talk about it here.


To simplify: JavaScript is for web stuff only. Want to do that? Go with it. If not, you can go with Java instead, or one of the many other programming languages available to you. And don't be fooled: Java is not too difficult. In fact, many consider it a very good language for beginners. I personally don't really like it, but I agree that it's rather good to get into programming itself.
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Offline Ashbad

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #18 on: January 20, 2013, 04:52:48 pm
At first I didn't want to ask about the differences of Java and Javascript since I was worried we were derailing the topic, but I guess it has to do with game development..! Why are these two separate, and what use is learning javascript (other than it being beginner friendly?)

First of all, I'd like to point out that Java is probably just as beginner friendly as Javascript; hence why it's usually taught to first-year college Comp. Sci. students and AP Comp. Sci. students as a base language.

Javascript is generally used as a scripting language with web pages, but its use goes beyond just that.  It's a fun but powerful language and it's straightforward enough to learn basic programming concepts from; it's probably not my top recommendation for such purposes, however.  Here's an explanation of why they have similar names:

Quote
... The change of name from LiveScript to JavaScript roughly coincided with Netscape adding support for Java technology in its Netscape Navigator web browser. The final choice of name caused confusion, giving the impression that the language was a spin-off of the Java programming language, and the choice has been characterized by many as a marketing ploy by Netscape to give JavaScript the cachet of what was then the hot new web programming language.[11][12] It has also been claimed that the language's name is the result of a co-marketing deal between Netscape and Sun, in exchange for Netscape bundling Sun's Java runtime with its then-dominant browser.

Java is an even more versatile language; it's a purely Object Oriented language, with a syntax very similar to that of C/C++.  It's a (JIT) compiled language -- which for now you can just take to mean "faster execution".  Javascript is (generally) interpreted, and is therefore generally slower.  One of Java's design purposes was to give software developers efficiency and control similar to that of C/C++, but with better cross-platform support (a single Java executable conceivably will run on any device that has a Java VM; A C/C++ program has to be compiled for each type of device/Operating System in order to run on them.)

With more sugarcoat: Java is focused more around general-purpose programming; Javascript can be used similarly, but its main focus is around Webpage scripting.  Java is generally faster than Javascript.  Java and Javascript have different language syntax (similar to how English and Chinese have different language syntax.)

With that in mind, Java is often seen as a more viable platform for developing games on than Javascript.  Not that there aren't games written in JS, of course, there are just far less.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I think the Code Academy is a great place to learn some of the basics of programming.  Another great option is to try learning a language like Python; it's a powerful language, but it's also great for beginners as well.  It even has an SDL wrapper, and even better for beginners, Pygame ( http://www.pygame.org/news.html ), which is perfectly fine for generally 2D game development.

Lua + LOVE is another common one, and I personally support the idea of learning Lua since it's an interesting and simple language that's good for beginners as well.

I'd say that while Java isn't hard to learn, I think it's a bad place to start when you have Lua/Python/others.  Especially since even the most basic programs require a lot of surrounding code that takes a while to understand.

Mastery of Java would probably lead one into C/C++/Obj-C, which are definitely a bit harder to get a good grasp of.  They provide some of the fastest code execution speeds at the cost of a steep learning curve.  Definitely not the place to start, but somewhere you should try to get to.

Assembly goes past that in difficulty; it hasn't been an essential in a game programmer's toolkit for over a decade, but learning and getting profficient at an assembly language for one architecture or more is an incredible skill to have (and it looks quite good on a resume!)  If nothing else it teaches you to become a much more wary C/C++/Obj-C programmer, and a better programmer in general.

Offline Crow

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #19 on: January 20, 2013, 05:13:39 pm
Lua + LOVE is another common one, and I personally support the idea of learning Lua since it's an interesting and simple language that's good for beginners as well.

Is that a common combination by now? That's a nice thing to hear, LÖVE has my full support. Very nice team, good project :) And another thing: when you say Lua is a simple language, I hope you don't underestimate it. Lua is one of the fastest scripting languages around, offering almost the same speed in code execution as lower level languages in some fields. It's easy to learn, yes, but very powerful. Just like Python :-*
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Offline Ashbad

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #20 on: January 20, 2013, 05:26:40 pm
Is that a common combination by now? That's a nice thing to hear, LÖVE has my full support. Very nice team, good project :) And another thing: when you say Lua is a simple language, I hope you don't underestimate it. Lua is one of the fastest scripting languages around, offering almost the same speed in code execution as lower level languages in some fields. It's easy to learn, yes, but very powerful. Just like Python :-*

Definitely, of course :) It's powerful and the fact it can be so seamlessly integrated with C makes it even more so.  By "simple" I was going for more of a "simple to learn the basics with", as opposed to C which is more of the opposite.  Probably a bad choice of wording :(

As for the popularity of LOVE, a year ago I hadn't heard of it much, but nowadays many of the people I see on gamedev/tech forums are using it en masse.  Personally I haven't done much more than play around with it for a little bit, but I'm really glad to see that more people are flocking towards it and have a better opportunity to learn while making cool games.

Offline Crow

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #21 on: January 20, 2013, 06:09:11 pm
As for the popularity of LOVE, a year ago I hadn't heard of it much, but nowadays many of the people I see on gamedev/tech forums are using it en masse.  Personally I haven't done much more than play around with it for a little bit, but I'm really glad to see that more people are flocking towards it and have a better opportunity to learn while making cool games.

It's definitely very nice. Found out about it when it was at version 0.4.x, and I then played around with it a bit. Wrote a basic tiling engine, some keyboard and mouse input handlers and the like.
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Offline Lachie Dazdarian

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #22 on: January 20, 2013, 06:53:51 pm
I think it is very easy to start programming games today with all the tools available, both free and charged, from heaps of free resources, demos, tutorials, to superb 3rd party libraries for sound, physics and graphics effects. Game dev kits (or SDKs) are another level of making it all easier.

I always considered programming the least challenging and least talent-requiring part of game development. Again, it comes down to what you want to accomplish by learning to program, like if you want to do it professionally and, I don't know, develop your own 3D engines. Also, maybe developing a specific engine like the one in The World of Goo might be problematic.

But in general, supporting/putting into reality your gameplay design, writing, art and composing talents with programming/using game dev kits is easier that ever before and the least problem in game development, in my opinion.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 06:57:58 pm by Lachie Dazdarian »

Offline PixelPiledriver

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #23 on: January 20, 2013, 08:56:29 pm
Quote
I always considered programming the least challenging and least talent-requiring part of game development.
:'(

There's another path for beginners:
Skim assembly and then learn C and then C++.
It's a slower and more brutal start, but as you move to other languages they will seem easier.

But honestly starting anywhere will teach you good things.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 08:59:14 pm by PixelPiledriver »
And knowing that it is, we seek what it is... ~ Aristotle, Posterior Analytics, Chapter 1

Offline Lachie Dazdarian

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #24 on: January 20, 2013, 09:00:31 pm
Emphasis on game development. Not saying programming in general is easy. On the contrary.

It's still in my opinion EASIER to master a programming language than drawing or composing music, as it is mostly skill, very little talent.

Offline Ymedron

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #25 on: January 20, 2013, 09:15:16 pm
I've seen people improve astonishingly quickly when they take up art. It takes dedication and lots of life-drawing, but it's probably not any harder than learning to program without having to look up help every time you want to call up a variable or something.
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Offline PixelPiledriver

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #26 on: January 20, 2013, 09:27:07 pm
We can make music and art with code.
A program can be an instrument, a canvas etc.
Programming is an art form not a science.

But really I was joking with the :'(
How you perceive it works for you.

Programming made me a better artist.
Art made me a better programmer.
And I'm still not that great.  :lol:
To me they are the same thing.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2013, 09:31:25 pm by PixelPiledriver »
And knowing that it is, we seek what it is... ~ Aristotle, Posterior Analytics, Chapter 1

Offline Lachie Dazdarian

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #27 on: January 20, 2013, 09:28:32 pm
Perception is a marvelous thing.

Offline PixelPiledriver

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #28 on: January 21, 2013, 02:14:05 pm
Moved all the newest links to the top.

Quote
I'm also working my way through Codecademy, Javascript at the moment
Awesome.  :y:
Let us know how it goes.
And knowing that it is, we seek what it is... ~ Aristotle, Posterior Analytics, Chapter 1

Offline Arne

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #29 on: January 22, 2013, 12:36:47 am
I very much feel my own intellectual limitations when it comes to programming. There are some basic problems which I just can't wrap my mind around because they are so completely beyond me, despite me having programmed on and off for decades. Meanwhile, some clever 16 year old does it with ease, and I'm not getting any smarter. With art, though I've never been a prodigy, I've always felt that I can at least reach many of the more appealing goals with some persistence.

On the topic of beginner's languages, I like to use BlitzMax because I started with C64 BASIC long ago. BlitzMax is BASIC which scales pretty well into an OOP form. You can learn concepts like the sequentiality of instructions, loops, jumps, various variables, move onto arrays, includes, then classes, pointers and linked lists, polymorphism, even inline asm, etc.  I wouldn't list BlitzMax as game engine. It's easy to get an OpenGL graphical display up and draw stuff, but to my knowledge there's no way around programming everything that you want to happen. There are no object/map/physics editors or anything like that.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2013, 12:38:54 am by Arne »

Offline 2dgamers

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #30 on: January 24, 2013, 06:46:39 pm
Don't forget the infamous Adventure Game Studio (AGS)
http://www.adventuregamestudio.co.uk/

Offline JillandJack

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #31 on: April 16, 2013, 03:52:40 am
For people who know nothing about code and still want to make a game:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsfSbHrA7uY

He has the most up to date tutorials on gamemaker and slowly introduces you to gamemaker code.
If your just starting out PixelPileDriver has a great blog to help you get started:
http://ppdaniatlas.blogspot.ca/
Hopefully you get as much as I have out of it :)

Offline PypeBros

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #32 on: April 16, 2013, 09:45:00 am
how much I love the smell of bare memory-mapped registers compared to these bunch of libraries... One proper poke to memory and you're changing the location of your sprite, the background colour, the volume on channel 3, the scroll offset for the layer 2 and the zoom of layer 3 ...

remnants of my C64 years, I guess.

Oh, and of course, if you're serious about game development, you're very likely to have checked Kirby Kid's Critical Gaming blog because you've understood that gameplay and level design are as valuable as your coding and graphics skills ;)

Offline #36005A

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #33 on: April 17, 2013, 04:49:05 pm
Surprised not to see our own AdamAtomic's Flixel for Flash game dev.

Offline Crow

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #34 on: April 17, 2013, 05:00:38 pm
Surprised not to see our own AdamAtomic's Flixel for Flash game dev.

Oh my, good point. Added!
Discord: Ennea#9999

Offline Ymedron

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #35 on: April 17, 2013, 06:09:50 pm
I found a couple sites that have something to do with game design:
http://howtonotsuckatgamedesign.com/
http://howtonotsuckatgamedesign.tumblr.com/
http://critical-gaming.squarespace.com/gamedesign101/
Maybe these will have something of interest and use?
Also my art tumblr: ymedronart.tumblr.com

Offline mack

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #36 on: April 22, 2013, 10:16:44 pm
Hi!

I'm using C# for my basic 2D engine, and here are some useful tools:
http://msgpack.org/
http://slimdx.org/
http://luaforge.net/projects/luainterface/
http://www.ambiera.com/irrklang/

Eventually, I'll make it cross-platform by building it with Mono and OpenGL

Hope this is useful for anyone!

Offline PypeBros

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Re: Game Developement

Reply #37 on: April 24, 2013, 08:41:44 am
(that would be perfect for a pearltree, btw)