AuthorTopic: Greasy?  (Read 3252 times)

Offline spawn

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Greasy?

on: February 20, 2011, 10:13:21 pm
I started working on a Hell-hound like creature last night. I'm afraid to continue, For the shading seems sort of...  Greasy? Anyone Know what i'm doing wrong? :(
6 colors.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2011, 02:47:47 am by spawn »

Offline Mathias

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Re: Greasy?

Reply #1 on: February 21, 2011, 03:05:26 am
Texturing. Materials.

Are you conscious of what type of material it is that you're rendering? Each different material type receives light differently. Like, here you're using too much highlight. Things are looking too reflective, like metal. Apparently that's not what you want. Make things duller/less reflective.

And why is this thing so huge? You'll probably run out of steam before you finish it anyway. I'd be using full-color digi-paintin' for it, not pixel art.

Offline spawn

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Re: Greasy?

Reply #2 on: February 21, 2011, 03:31:46 am
Hmm, yea I really should do some reading up on and practicing on texture. Time to do some studying, good advice!  :)
 I've never painted in my life actually.. I wouldn't know how to..

Offline Mathias

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Re: Greasy?

Reply #3 on: February 21, 2011, 04:00:11 am
Careful not to over-sciencify it. When we talk about it, it sounds like rocket science sometimes, but it's far from it. Get some basic art principle knowledge and it'll start to come naturally. After a while, there's nothin' to it. Only real requirements are time and patience.

Offline yaomon17

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Re: Greasy?

Reply #4 on: February 21, 2011, 04:33:59 am
Shrik it a bit?  :huh:

Offline spawn

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Re: Greasy?

Reply #5 on: February 21, 2011, 05:02:10 am
Shrik it a bit?  :huh:
I, I don't know what to say to that or what that means, if that was directed at me...
 ???


Thanks for the advice Mathias.
 ;D

Offline yaomon17

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Re: Greasy?

Reply #6 on: February 21, 2011, 05:57:18 am
Whoops, I meant shrink. Pixel art is generally hard to work with at a large size.  :crazy:

Offline spawn

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Re: Greasy?

Reply #7 on: February 21, 2011, 06:00:11 am
Whoops, I meant shrink. Pixel art is generally hard to work with at a large size.  :crazy:
O, haha I should have know you meant that. But, I prefer making large art.  :P

Offline Stefano

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Re: Greasy?

Reply #8 on: February 21, 2011, 02:11:40 pm
Adding to what Mathias said, when you have an uneven, rugged surface (such as clean skin), light will be reflected in varying angles and directions. The visual aspect of the reflection will be fuzzy and distributed, such as we see in velvet, for instance.
On the other hand, on polished or glossy surfaces light bounces on even angles and directions, creating a distinctive area of reflection called specular highlight. The effect is commonly seen on resins, glass, metal and other reflexive materials. If you have oily skin (grease), you eliminate its imperfections, thus creating the clear areas of reflection. It's what you currently have on your piece.

A couple of years ago, Arne has put together a very concise and yet broad tutorial, that covers most aspects of the basics of the classical approach to painting.
Check out the "Light Stuff" and "Materials" sections for some interesting examples!

Try reducing the specular highlights and you'll reduce shininess (and thus greasiness).
Where exactly is your light source?