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Messages - ddustin
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Unpaid Work / [Coder] How to find art partner for a game
« on: May 27, 2020, 06:53:12 pm »
What is the best way to find an artist that is working and / or wants to work on a game?
Ive got over a decade of coding experience and am confident I can make anything (within reason).

Ideally Id like to find someone whose already done a lot of art that could fit together in a single game. Im partial to the pixelated style but whatever the artist is most familiar with matters more.

Id like to find somebody whose passionate about doing a project and ideally we could split the royalties evenly. I worry that paying someone might make them lose that passion but perhaps I could give someone a forward on royalties if they cant afford to work without pay for a while.

Whats the best way to approach something like this? Id love some advice from people whove done this before. Or even just tips like dont do this annoying thing everyone else does.

Thanks.

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General Discussion / Re: Difficulty in Finding Quality Artists
« on: October 20, 2009, 07:01:29 pm »
It looks like I got two responses that were pretty impressive.  Awesome!

I have to get into this networking stuff though.  Do you know anywhere I can find good musicians and sfx guys?

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General Discussion / Difficulty in Finding Quality Artists
« on: October 19, 2009, 07:30:12 pm »
I'm a programmer and I've struggled with this for years now.  It looks like the 'Work' section doesn't get too many replies.

How do you recommend finding quality talent?  All the times I have it has been through pure luck.

Best,
Dustin Dettmer

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General Discussion / Re: Goblins Of The Game Industry
« on: July 02, 2008, 11:10:19 pm »
Quote
Project leader: "We need to get x feature done."
Programmer: "I don't want to work on that, I want to work on this system."
Project leader: "We don't need that system yet, we need this feature."
Programmer: "If you push me, its not going to make me work any harder."

(If any team member is "threatening" you so they can do what they want, get rid of them immediately.
 Never give someone power enough to be able to stay and do as they wish
especially with something as important as the programming of the game.)


Project leader:" I need a "wild beast" as soon as possible."
Artist: "I'm working on goblins right now..I'll get to it when I can."
Project leader: "Please work on the wild beast for now. Its needed more."
Artist: "You can't make me drop a project in the middle to work on something else
You asked for my help and I'm giving it to you, but some things need to be done my way."

(Make sure you're being assertive with your team members, if they can't give a valid reason why
  they can't work on something else then they should not argue. Beware of people who have a
"card" they play from their hand often.)
I like parts of your post.  The section quoted above is one I sincerely disagree with.

Gaining assertive control over your teammates is the largest killer of creativity I know.  I'll tell you right now I'm going to program the way I want because I know how I program best.  To think some project leader could know better than me is just part of the idiotic dogma preached by corporate America.

A good "project leader" will provide rational arguments for all the things he wants done.  The team members will see these rational arguments and come to the same conclusion as the leader.  Any other system will hurt people individualities, egos and the quality of the game.

All this being said, I only work with sane and rational people.  Because of this I do not need to teach rationality to my team.  Maybe your advice applies correctly if you are working with irrational people.

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