AuthorTopic: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation  (Read 50142 times)

Offline Helm

  • 0110
  • *****
  • Posts: 5142
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Asides-Bsides

THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

on: February 09, 2007, 10:15:12 am
Quote
* Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless like water. If you put water in a cup it becomes the cup, if you put into a bottle it becomes the bottle. You put water into a teapot it becomes the teapot. Now, water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend.

There is no distinction between pixel art styles. They are all aspects of one thing. Study it holistically.

Quote
* Like everyone else you want to learn the way to win, but never to accept the way to lose - to accept defeat. To learn to die is to be liberated from it. So when tomorrow comes you must free your ambitious mind and learn the art of dying!

Attempt pixel art beyond your comfort zone. Be ready to face failure, for you will learn from it! Don't do the same thing over and over again!

Quote
When there is freedom from mechanical conditioning, there is simplicity. The classical man is just a bundle of routine, ideas and tradition. If you follow the classical pattern, you are understanding the routine, the tradition, the shadow you are not understanding yourself.

Pixel art skills are no different from any other art skills. There is no point to obsess over technical details of pixel art if only to forget that it is as much a technical methodology, as it is intuitive art

Quote
A goal is not always meant to be reached, it often serves simply as something to aim at.

Enjoy the making of the art as much as the benefits of presenting the end result!

Quote
A martial artist who drills exclusively to a set pattern of combat is losing his freedom. He is actually becoming a slave to a choice pattern and feels that the pattern is the real thing. It leads to stagnation because the way of combat is never based on personal choice and fancies, but constantly changes from moment to moment, and the disappointed combatant will soon find out that his "choice routine" lacks pliability. There must be a "being" instead of a "doing" in training. One must be free. Instead of complexity of form, there should be simplicity of expression.

Those that only draw fighter sprites, or rpg tiles, or only game-art are losing their freedom! Practise everything and your specialties will benefit! nonetheless

Quote
All fixed set patterns are incapable of adaptability or pliability. The truth is outside of all fixed patterns.

Quote
Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself; do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it.

Hear that SNK copiers and Capcom copiers! Don't do as they do! Do as you'd do!

Quote
Art is the expression of the self. The more complicated and restricted the method, the less the opportunity for expression of one's original sense of freedom. Though they play an important role in the early stage, the techniques should not be too mechanical, complex or restrictive. If we cling blindly to them, we shall eventually become bound by their limitations. Remember, you are expressing the techniques and not doing the techniques.

The limitation is only meaninful if it breeds expression which would not otherwise occur without said limitation

Quote
Do not deny the classical approach, simply as a reaction, or you will have created another pattern and trapped yourself there.

One should study and understand proper pixelling techniques before saying 'I do not need this!'

Quote
I am happy because I am growing daily and I am honestly not knowing where the limit lies. To be certain, every day there can be a revelation or a new discovery. I treasure the memory of the past misfortunes. It has added more to my bank of fortitude.

Do not be ashamed of past errors! Be glad for them and push forward! Do not try to just outrun your friends. Don't just try to outrun the bear. Try to outrun GOD. There is no limit!

Quote
I hope martial artists are more interested in the root of martial arts and not the different decorative branches, flowers or leaves.

SNK people! Capcom people! There is only one Pixel Art!

Quote
If you always put limit on everything you do, physical or anything else. It will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.

Quote
If you spend too much time thinking about a thing, you'll never get it done.

Make more art than you think about it! Practise as much as you can, all sorts of art!

Quote
In Jeet Kune-Do, physical conditioning is a must for all martial artists. If you are not physically fit, you have no business doing any hard sparring. To me, the best exercise for this is running. Running is so important that you should keep it up during your lifetime. What time of the day you run is not important as long as you run. In the beginning you should jog easily and then gradually increase the distance and tempo, and finally include sprints to develop your 'wind.' Let me give you a bit of warning: just because you get very good at your training it should not go to your head that you are an expert. Remember, actual sparring is the ultimate, and the training is only a means toward this. Besides running, one should also do exercises for the stomach sit-ups, leg raises, etc. Too often one of those big-belly masters will tell you that his internal power has sunk to his stomach; he's not kidding, it is sunk and gone! To put it bluntly, he is nothing but fat and ugly.

Not related. I just found it awesome.

Quote
In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.

When challenging yourself with difficult Pixel Art subjects, new solutions will come to you!

Quote
It is true that the mental aspect of kung-fu is the desired end; however, to achieve this end, technical skill must come first.

The more technical practise you do in the Way of the Pixel, at the end you'll come across the Pixel itself.

Quote
Jeet Kune Do, It's just a name, don't fuss over it. There's no such thing as a style if you understand the roots of combat.

Selout/AA/Dithering/Color Conservation/Hue Tinting/Whatever, are just names. Don't fuss over them. In action, it all becomes one thing.

Quote
Let the spirit out Discard all thoughts of reward, all hopes of praise and fears of blame, all awareness of one's bodily self. And, finally closing the avenues of sense perception, let the spirit out, as it will.

Do not think why you pixel, but pixel. Pixel Zen.

Quote
Take no thought of who is right or wrong or who is better than. Be not for or against.

Do not concern yourself with measuring your pixel art idols against each other. Concern yourself with the Art.

Quote
When I look around I always learn something, and that is to be yourself always, express yourself, and have faith in yourself. Do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate him.

Finally:

Quote
The key to immortality is first living a life worth remembering.

Offline Panda

  • Administrator
  • 0100
  • *
  • Posts: 1014
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • 威風堂々
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #1 on: February 09, 2007, 10:33:58 am
Heh, now the banners have a reason to exist.
Bruce was a neat man.

Offline khorin

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 104
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • I ruled the forces that fueled your hate.
    • View Profile
    • Shizucor

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #2 on: February 09, 2007, 03:55:05 pm
Ahhh it's always refreshing to read Bruce's words again.

Offline ptoing

  • Administrator
  • 0101
  • *
  • Posts: 3048
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • variegated quadrangle arranger
    • the_ptoing
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/2191.htm
    • View Profile
    • ptoing bloing

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #3 on: February 09, 2007, 04:04:35 pm
 !yus!

There are no ugly colours, only ugly combinations of colours.

Offline Cow

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 528
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #4 on: February 09, 2007, 04:26:36 pm
This is cool, great advice. Drinks all around!

Quote
Be ready to face failure, for you will learn from it!
That one's pretty nice to hear. Because I have failed a lot. :P

Offline Zolthorg

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 474
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #5 on: February 09, 2007, 09:36:57 pm
 :hehe: i'm still in the failure phase

Scotteh

  • Guest

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #6 on: February 09, 2007, 09:59:03 pm
Who's Bruce?

Offline ptoing

  • Administrator
  • 0101
  • *
  • Posts: 3048
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • variegated quadrangle arranger
    • the_ptoing
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/2191.htm
    • View Profile
    • ptoing bloing

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #7 on: February 09, 2007, 10:00:13 pm
Lee

There are no ugly colours, only ugly combinations of colours.

Scotteh

  • Guest

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #8 on: February 09, 2007, 10:00:47 pm
oh, ok ;D

Offline Rydin

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 838
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • ...zzzt...
    • View Profile
    • hitori

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #9 on: February 10, 2007, 08:34:45 am
Jeet Kune Do = real-time, dynamic chop suey

...from what I can remember...should really re-read his paper... :-\


Great job translating to pixels!
Man cannot remake himself without suffering for he is both the marble and the sculptor.

Offline eck

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 322
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • But why is RUM gone???
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #10 on: February 11, 2007, 11:30:03 pm
*meditates*
untz untz untz?

Offline Zach

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 405
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Bear
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #11 on: February 13, 2007, 05:40:10 pm
yoiiii this is nice :D

thankies helm!
EAT PUNAJI  BECAUSE IT'S GOOD AND TASTY

Offline Luzeke

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 116
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • I draw, therefore I ink.
    • View Profile
    • inkBot

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #12 on: February 20, 2007, 01:48:57 pm
I was listening to "Budget Meeting" from the King Arthur soundtrack when reading this. Made for a very unusual reading experience. :)

This one is the best:

"Do not be ashamed of past errors! Be glad for them and push forward! Do not try to just outrun your friends. Don't just try to outrun the bear. Try to outrun GOD. There is no limit!"

 ;D

Offline skw

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 390
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Stuck in the Nineties.
    • View Profile
    • Johnny Theodore Customs

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #13 on: July 09, 2007, 09:37:10 am
hey, that was a really nice reading!

Quote from: Helm
Quote
It is true that the mental aspect of kung-fu is the desired end; however, to achieve this end, technical skill must come first.

The more technical practise you do in the Way of the Pixel, at the end you'll come across the Pixel itself.

^ my favourite!

“Mere technical knowledge is only the beginning of Pixel Fu. To master it, one must enter into the spirit of it.”

“There are lots of guys around the world that are lazy. They have big fat guts. They talk about chi power and things they can do, but don't believe it.”
Quote
Even a common man by obtaining knowledge becomes a Buddha.
sexual content, click at your own risk! https://www.facebook.com/szumprodukcje /also known as skurwy

Offline Rydin

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 838
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • ...zzzt...
    • View Profile
    • hitori

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #14 on: October 11, 2007, 03:02:22 am
I argue that art is enjoyable even if you aren't good. *

Quote
I am happy because I am growing daily and I am honestly not knowing where the limit lies. To be certain, every day there can be a revelation or a new discovery. I treasure the memory of the past misfortunes. It has added more to my bank of fortitude.

Focus on the other aspects that are fun...otherwise just don't enjoy it for a while.  ;)
Man cannot remake himself without suffering for he is both the marble and the sculptor.

Offline ptoing

  • Administrator
  • 0101
  • *
  • Posts: 3048
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • variegated quadrangle arranger
    • the_ptoing
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/2191.htm
    • View Profile
    • ptoing bloing

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #15 on: October 11, 2007, 12:38:51 pm
Art is not enjoyable if you're not good at it.

That totally depends on your mindset.
Also if art is not enjoyable if you are not good at it, please explain more than half of Deviantart to me.
Fail!

There are no ugly colours, only ugly combinations of colours.

Offline sharprm

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 660
  • Karma: +0/-3
  • INTP/INTJ
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #16 on: October 11, 2007, 01:14:01 pm
Art is not enjoyable if you're not good at it.
Yet in order to get good at it, you must do it.

Explain your way out of THAT paradox.

You don't do it because its enjoyable but just want to improve. Or your concept of what is 'good' is never beyond what you can draw. For instance, in kindergarden I thought i was great because i drew the
arms and legs coming out of a body, rather than coming out of the head, like the other kid did. Now I think there is more to drawing figures than just that, but I'm still think I'm awesome because I don't think proper anatomy is that important.
Modern artists are told that they must create something totally original-or risk being called "derivative".They've been indoctrinated with the concept that bad=good.The effect is always the same: Meaningless primitivism
http://www.artrenewal.org/articles/Philosophy/phi

Offline JJ Naas

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 409
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
    • My Deviantart page

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #17 on: October 12, 2007, 07:12:53 pm
I'd say being able to be enthusiastic about something in a long run equals creativity. When you're enthusiastic enough to try keep on doing whatever it is.. drawing, playing guitar, writing stories, it'll eventually lead to mastering enough skills to make something good.

Offline ptoing

  • Administrator
  • 0101
  • *
  • Posts: 3048
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • variegated quadrangle arranger
    • the_ptoing
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/2191.htm
    • View Profile
    • ptoing bloing

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #18 on: October 13, 2007, 12:36:07 am
I'd say being able to be enthusiastic about something in a long run equals creativity. When you're enthusiastic enough to try keep on doing whatever it is.. drawing, playing guitar, writing stories, it'll eventually lead to mastering enough skills to make something good.

Quoted for truth!

There are no ugly colours, only ugly combinations of colours.

Offline Helm

  • 0110
  • *****
  • Posts: 5142
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Asides-Bsides

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #19 on: January 27, 2008, 06:10:54 pm
It's strange to put these two things against each other and compare them. In the aspect that you're not actually leaving much behind in terms of self expression and enduring artistry while playing a game no matter how good you are.

Offline ndchristie

  • 0100
  • ***
  • Posts: 2425
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #20 on: January 27, 2008, 10:32:16 pm
I don't understand what you mean by "enduring artistry", and what could I do to express something in an image? What is there to express? An image is an image. I've heard of a lot of artists saying a lot about expression but they never did back it up, as if they assume the reader to know what they mean. Color me one of the (apparent) few that doesn't. Also, only great artists really leave behind a reputation. There's no recognition in it anymore unless you're dead.

What do you mean nobody has ever backed it up?  Perhaps you have just never understood (and you have not, by your own admittance), but that does not mean that you are right to discredit the millions (perhaps hundreds of millions) of people who have spoken about and published on the subject of expression through the visual medias.

In terms of no recognition until death, that's simply false, past and present.  True, many artists receive posthumous recognition, in many cases by their own desire, but modern medicine and rapid communication makes recognition during ones lifetime very common.  Most of the "great" artists of the past 200 years were recognized in their lifetime on at least some level, even those who were reclusive.  to name a few -

Andrew Wyeth
Picasso
Monet
Manet
Toulouse-Lautrec
Suerat
Degas
El Greco
Sargent
Hopper
Matthew Barney
Zac Smith!!!!
Caspar David Friedrich

and that's just my top favorites* just in a minute or two until i got bored of typing, this name should be thousands of names long

*with the exception of el greco, sargent and barney
« Last Edit: January 27, 2008, 10:33:50 pm by Adarias »
A mistake is a mistake.
The same mistake twice is a bad habit.
The same mistake three or more times is a motif.

Offline ptoing

  • Administrator
  • 0101
  • *
  • Posts: 3048
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • variegated quadrangle arranger
    • the_ptoing
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/2191.htm
    • View Profile
    • ptoing bloing

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #21 on: January 27, 2008, 10:49:56 pm
What is there to express?

Have you never looked at a painting or any kind of picture for that matter and felt something that left a lasting impression on you? If not, then I am sad for you.

There are no ugly colours, only ugly combinations of colours.

Offline Feron

  • 0100
  • ***
  • Posts: 1124
  • Karma: +0/-1
  • Carpe Diem
    • View Profile
    • Pixelheart

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #22 on: January 27, 2008, 11:23:37 pm
I meant that nobody's actually explained it (that I've seen). Maybe it's just me and I don't understand expression as readily as the average person. The core question is "What expression is there in an image?" Do video game graphics have any expression in them? If so, how can you tell? If all art has expression, what do you say about the pieces that are crappy?

The expression of an image depends on the picture you are looking at.  By the colors, the forms, the direction of strokes (if we're talking painting), just every basic aspect of a painting will be chosen (probably sub-consciously) to give some feeling and emotion.  Hopefully the viewers would also feel this emotion and therefore the art would have an impression on them.  If you don't feel this, then you have no soul  :P

Video game graphics are made to be functional, they have a primary use of on-screen readability and have to work in game.  A painting does not.  I doubt many video game creators try and capture emotions in 24x24 sprites, unlike a traditional artist would who is creating for an entirely different reason.

Offline ndchristie

  • 0100
  • ***
  • Posts: 2425
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #23 on: January 28, 2008, 02:22:26 am
I meant that nobody's actually explained it (that I've seen).
there's a book written about every subject known to man, and plenty of those are about expression in art.  such scholarly sources are probably better at explaining than we are to someone who just doesn't understand it by looking.

You are right, on the one hand, an image does not necessitate art in the same way that sound does not necessitate music, yet most people can recognize music and art readily enough.  Thereby no, not all images have expression.

Furthermore, not all art is expressive.  there is a great deal of art that tries to stay away from expression.  Here is a short list of general artistic qualifiers and their "antonyms".  Please bear in mind that not only are these only vague descriptors, but that even those that seem to conflict are not by any means mutually exclusive.

Naturalistic - Of or mimicking nature as close as it can be experienced by the eyes (and, at times, the hand).
Abstract - Not intending to appear or feel like nature.

Representational/Objective - Intended to denote real or plausible objects, places, or events.
Non-Representational/Non-Objective - Not intended to denote real or plausible objects, places, or events.

Mannered - Intended to demonstrate technical prowess; to serve mundane purpose.
Expressive - Intended to demonstrate emotion; to serve "artistic" purpose.

then there is further qualification within Expressive pieces, based on whether the expression comes from the artist or the piece itself.  Laocoon and his sons by a Rhodian collaboration and Ugolino and sons by Carpeaux are both pieces which contain very expressive subjects, and these evoke personal reactions from the viewer (or at least, they should!), but the hand that made them was very measured, mannered, and NOT what is considered to be expressive.

Similarly, Piet Mondrian produced some works that was intended to evoke emotion, but were by themselves very mannered, while Jackson Pollack tended to produce works that were purely expressive.

It continues to be confusing, however, because many artists manage to be both meticulous AND expressive. 
Another work by Mondrian demonstrates his breadth of character.  Furthermore, desperation and haste does not always mean expressive, as such 'fits of inspiration' only demonstrate what the artist feels is a great idea and not necessarily one of emotional importance.

The biggest kicker though?  Not all expression is expressionism.  Expressionism deals primarily (and some would argue, exclusively) with "big" emotions, overwhelming sensations.  Reflection of calmer, more passive feelings is often overlooked in talking about expressionism because (in my perhaps overly-critical opinion) many of the people* who get all hot and bothered by splashy red paint and piss christ don't always take the time to appreciate simpler things.  To say that Monet's lovingly rendered, meticulously rendered, intimately rendered gardens are without expression is to piss in the face of art (to express my disdain politely).

In the end i think it still just comes down to feeling.  There is, at least to those who appreciate art, a tangible presence of the creator's hand in all art, and it is very easy to tell which hand was forced, which hand was passionate, which hand was timid, which hand was gentle, and so on.

*(and by that i mean one in a million - 99.9% of good artists are intelligent.  still....there are a lot of dicks; i could be one for all i know)
« Last Edit: January 28, 2008, 05:08:42 am by Adarias »
A mistake is a mistake.
The same mistake twice is a bad habit.
The same mistake three or more times is a motif.

Offline AdamAtomic

  • Administrator
  • 0100
  • *
  • Posts: 1188
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • natural born medic
    • View Profile
    • Adam Atomic

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #24 on: January 28, 2008, 04:21:10 am
if you want to jump into feeling expression feet first, i highly recommend la guernica at the reina sofia...when i saw it i felt like i'd been punched in the stomach and couldn't move for about 30 minutes!

Offline ndchristie

  • 0100
  • ***
  • Posts: 2425
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #25 on: January 28, 2008, 05:21:07 am
forgot to mention that expression does not need to be intentional in the same way that emotions are seldom intentional.  if something of you comes out on the page without your meaning it, it's a thousand times more expressive than a work where every emotional investment is measured by the ounce.
A mistake is a mistake.
The same mistake twice is a bad habit.
The same mistake three or more times is a motif.

Offline Helm

  • 0110
  • *****
  • Posts: 5142
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Asides-Bsides

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #26 on: January 28, 2008, 01:43:58 pm
Quote
I don't understand what you mean by "enduring artistry", and what could I do to express something in an image? What is there to express? An image is an image. I've heard of a lot of artists saying a lot about expression but they never did back it up, as if they assume the reader to know what they mean. Color me one of the (apparent) few that doesn't. Also, only great artists really leave behind a reputation. There's no recognition in it anymore unless you're dead.

Enduring artistry is any piece of tangible art left behind when you're done expressing yourself through art. I don't care if it's game-art or oil-painting, and it has nothing to do with recognition from your peers. Playing a videogame is an activity that could be deemed expressive initself but leaves no trace once the console is off, besides in your fleeting memory. I am not discrediting that feeling, that memory, but it's a different beast from a painting you might draw today and look at again tomorrow or 30 years from now. There is a reflection staring back at you from your art that is very emotionally important, clensing and to some degrees it builds character, humility and empathy. If you know nothing of these things you'd be surprised once you do.

What is there to express?

My answer to your question is: MU

Offline ndchristie

  • 0100
  • ***
  • Posts: 2425
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #27 on: January 29, 2008, 02:35:10 am
My answer to your question is: MU
Buddhist philosophy FTW (oh, and it turns out i learned something in college!)
A mistake is a mistake.
The same mistake twice is a bad habit.
The same mistake three or more times is a motif.

Offline Corsair

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 110
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • some assembly required
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #28 on: April 15, 2008, 02:41:43 am
I'm more of a creator than an onlooker. That is, I get more out of making things than I do looking at them. I don't really look at art galleries or anything; it's boring. I'm more interested in making my own stuff and getting better. I know I sound selfish, but I can't find a better way to explain why I don't enjoy looking at the art of others (outside of the concept or pixel art for some games).

okay, so if you're more of a creator than an onlooker, and you don't glean any pleasure from artistic pursuits, but rather observe/interact with video games...

How exactly are you more of a creator?

I don't mean to sound standoffish but it seems, at least to me, to be rather contradictory.

Offline Akira

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 335
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Heheheh
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #29 on: April 15, 2008, 11:25:33 am
He likes the process more than the product... I don't see any contradiction.
thanks Dogmeat!

Offline ilkke

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 234
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • pix off
    • iLkKke
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/9270.htm
    • View Profile
    • 'daily' art blog

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #30 on: April 30, 2008, 07:41:42 pm
Helm, this is very nice.
Only crit that I can possibly have is that most if not all of what was being said applies to much broader topics than just plain pixel art. Not really a crit, and this is a pixel forum after all, but in true spirit of those teachings why limit one's scope? Just thought I'd say that, I'm not implying anything. Moving on...

"Do not deny the classical approach, simply as a reaction, or you will have created another pattern and trapped yourself there."

Apart form your interpretation, I'd say this works on a larger scale. Many people try to keep the external pressure form crowding in on them and forcing them to work in this or that manner. Being anti-anything is in a sense as much limiting as being a conformist. Both are basing your actions on external pressures, just in juxtaposed manner. In other words, try pixeling approaches that others have made you despise, 'cause it's not about them, it's about yourself.

Also, I'd compare the physical fitness/technique practice with traditional art skills/pixel technique. Practicing composition, textures, colors, light etc and especially working from nature/reference all help pixel pushing, especially since pixel art has a layer of technical limits on top of everything that can prevent one from focusing on the art itself.
Maybe someone else has another interpretation? That is what I believe is the topic of the thread, not teaching fish to fly.
i

Offline Helm

  • 0110
  • *****
  • Posts: 5142
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Asides-Bsides

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #31 on: April 30, 2008, 09:47:43 pm
Yeah it's much wider if you want to look at it widely, this was just a playful pun on the banner bruce, really.

Quote
Practicing composition, textures, colors, light etc and especially working from nature/reference all help pixel pushing, especially since pixel art has a layer of technical limits on top of everything that can prevent one from focusing on the art itself.

This is very true. A lot of people become great technicians with pixels while masking real defeciencies on traditional skills below.

Offline sharprm

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 660
  • Karma: +0/-3
  • INTP/INTJ
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #32 on: May 24, 2008, 09:28:57 am
In regards to it being wider, I found this article interesting:

http://www.martialdevelopment.com/blog/advice-from-a-blind-kungfu-master/
Modern artists are told that they must create something totally original-or risk being called "derivative".They've been indoctrinated with the concept that bad=good.The effect is always the same: Meaningless primitivism
http://www.artrenewal.org/articles/Philosophy/phi

Offline Helm

  • 0110
  • *****
  • Posts: 5142
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Asides-Bsides

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #33 on: July 11, 2008, 01:07:09 pm
Yes. There's technical work in traditional skills and technical work in pixels. I said that a lot of people mask their technical deficiencies in traditional skills with their technical merits in pixel art. However:

Quote
I guess what I'm saying is that becoming a great technician in a medium is just as noteworthy as learning the fundamentals found in all media. It's merely a difference in priority; focusing on one medium and becoming extremely good at it, or learning the basics and being able to approach any medium. It's kinda like the difference between two characters in an RPG; let's say someone chooses a Fighter, focusing everything they have into Strength and Vitality (and thus becoming nearly immortal in melee, but a sitting duck in a magic fight), while someone else chooses a Rogue and has decent stats across the board (thus being good enough to get by in all situations). Both are effective in their own right.

I think this might be a comfortable (?) rationalization on your part because there really seems to be to me less merit to a pixel art technician without trad. skills than to one that knows both aspects of drawing. To carry your analogy, the artists that seem to have the best chance to make me feel the impact of their work are the ones that multiclass Anatomy/Composition/Mannerism/Pixel art. It might not be so for you, but I think it's an easy case to make that it is so for most.

Offline Cure

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 561
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Pixel Power
    • View Profile
    • Possum Art

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #34 on: September 13, 2008, 07:41:26 am
I'd forgotten why I posted here or what my original comment was in reference to. Hmm.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2010, 06:25:01 am by Cure »

Offline Shrub

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 36
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Newbie pixel artist.
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #35 on: April 02, 2010, 10:27:39 am
There is no spoon. Only your mind.
This means... uh, I dunno.

Offline zez

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 97
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #36 on: April 27, 2010, 10:59:04 pm
My answer to your question is: MU
"Upon hearing this, absolutely nobody was enlightened. Primarily because nobody could understand Chinese."

On a vague aside, am I the only person who gets an overwhelming sense of isolation from Xelados' avatar? No, really... It cant just be me, the way the sword is clearly the focal point, and its radiating all this energy, and then everything around it is just flat and vaguely representational, but just feels totally hallow, like nothing but the blade has any sort of soul?
Cant just be me...
« Last Edit: May 02, 2010, 08:00:16 pm by zez »

Offline zez

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 97
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #37 on: May 02, 2010, 07:59:10 pm
The first bit is a little tongue in cheek, and is basically philosophy for round eyes. One of the more common mistakes made in interpenetrating Taoist  and by proxy zen writings, comes from not catching the significance of the word 'Mu' and frequently leads to people either totally missing the point or using it to reinforce nihilist beliefs and/or general ego masturbation. That was also a direct quote from the principia discordia, as it seemed important. Mu, btw can be literally translated to no-thing, but rather then meaning literally that the answer to the question is nothing (generally done either too reinforce nihilism, or used to reinforce some sense of understanding of a deeper untranslatable meaning,) is actually a reference to the question itself holding no meaning or information.
The second part was actually literal truth. I did get an emotional reaction and impression from your work. If you WANT to take that to mean that art is purely in the eye and soul of the viewer, you could. If you want to take that to mean that someone unconsciously (or consciously at times,) puts a part of them self in everything the create, and that in itself makes it art, you could take that meaning away from it as well, however I wasnt actually making either statement, and was simply expressing my personal reaction to the piece.

Offline Mathias

  • 0100
  • ***
  • Posts: 1739
  • Karma: +2/-0
  • #COMPLACENT
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/9542.htm
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #38 on: May 08, 2010, 03:29:30 am
The first bit is a little tongue in cheek, and is basically philosophy for round eyes. One of the more common mistakes made in interpenetrating Taoist  and by proxy zen writings, comes from not catching the significance of the word 'Mu' and frequently leads to people either totally missing the point or using it to reinforce nihilist beliefs and/or general ego masturbation. That was also a direct quote from the principia discordia, as it seemed important. Mu, btw can be literally translated to no-thing, but rather then meaning literally that the answer to the question is nothing (generally done either too reinforce nihilism, or used to reinforce some sense of understanding of a deeper untranslatable meaning,) is actually a reference to the question itself holding no meaning or information.
The second part was actually literal truth. I did get an emotional reaction and impression from your work. If you WANT to take that to mean that art is purely in the eye and soul of the viewer, you could. If you want to take that to mean that someone unconsciously (or consciously at times,) puts a part of them self in everything the create, and that in itself makes it art, you could take that meaning away from it as well, however I wasnt actually making either statement, and was simply expressing my personal reaction to the piece.

So mu means "nothing", got it.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2010, 03:31:47 am by Mathias »

Offline Helm

  • 0110
  • *****
  • Posts: 5142
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Asides-Bsides

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #39 on: May 08, 2010, 06:25:05 pm
Exactly, so when asked 'what is there to express [with art]?' The only answer that comes to mind is...

Offline 0xDB

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 745
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Dennis inter-is.
    • dennisbusch_de
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/1287.htm
    • 0xdb
    • View Profile
    • 0xDB

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #40 on: May 09, 2010, 01:53:08 am
..candy-bars!

Offline Cure

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 561
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Pixel Power
    • View Profile
    • Possum Art

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #41 on: May 09, 2010, 06:11:35 pm
There are assumptions in every question. It's assumed that the goal of art is expression; that there is an object to be expressed; and that if the object is capable of being expressed, that art is capable of expressing it.
At least, those are the assumptions that I draw from the question.

And even if there hypothetically were no assumptions in the question, it seems that giving an answer other than 'mu' would then create assumptions, as mu is the only answer that is not based in assumptions or judgments of reality.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2010, 06:21:45 pm by Cure »

Offline zez

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 97
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #42 on: May 10, 2010, 05:33:20 pm
Now, let us further study this with our analytical minds so that we may come to some sort of understanding.... ::)

Offline 0xDB

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 745
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Dennis inter-is.
    • dennisbusch_de
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/1287.htm
    • 0xdb
    • View Profile
    • 0xDB

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #43 on: May 10, 2010, 06:20:36 pm
What is not to understand about candy-bars?

Offline Helm

  • 0110
  • *****
  • Posts: 5142
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Asides-Bsides

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #44 on: May 11, 2010, 08:33:46 am
candy-bars are more about experiencing them than understanding them !yus!

Offline 0xDB

  • 0011
  • **
  • Posts: 745
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Dennis inter-is.
    • dennisbusch_de
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/1287.htm
    • 0xdb
    • View Profile
    • 0xDB

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #45 on: May 11, 2010, 05:59:55 pm
* Dennis thinks of possible answers... options ( ridiculous: "That's what she said about my 'candy-bar'..." / smart ass: "In that sentence substitute candy-bars with one of { art, life, art of living } and I dare say it's still true." / semi-holistic: "Depends on who's thinking about the candy-bar. The candy-bar producer should understand how to create a tasty and visually attractive candy-bar which sells. So for him/her it is vital to understand it or he/she'll be out of business soon." / depressed: "Damn, I don't have any candy-bars left." / silly: "How appropriate you fight like a butter-scotch!" / ignorant: "Experience my ass! (..on second thought: No don't do that.)" / apologetic: "I'm sorry for the derailment." )
* Dennis isn't sure which answer to pick... maybe this minimalistic one, which leaves a lot of room for interpretation: "Such is art."

Offline Helm

  • 0110
  • *****
  • Posts: 5142
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Asides-Bsides

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #46 on: May 12, 2010, 11:50:01 am
All these answers are

Offline Dr D

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 415
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Not a real doctor.
    • View Profile
    • PJ Gallery

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #47 on: May 14, 2010, 07:05:51 am
Yes, I agree, they most definitely are

Offline zez

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 97
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #48 on: May 25, 2010, 01:32:50 am
I disagree, however I am likely wrong.
I believe it was the great philosopher Playdough who said it best with
"Nietzsche sagt gott ist tot; Gott sagt Nietzsche ist tot."

Offline Jetrel

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #49 on: June 12, 2011, 10:47:06 am
Art is not enjoyable if you're not good at it.

That totally depends on your mindset.
Also if art is not enjoyable if you are not good at it, please explain more than half of Deviantart to me.
Fail!

You're absolutely right;  it's very subjective, a lot of people are terrible, but love doing art anyways.

I do, however, want to affirm his pain - many of us have to go through a several-year "art purgatory" before our skills match up with a lofty sense of taste.  It hurts bad, and I'm pretty sure most of us who do have a sense of taste decide that it's not worth it, and quit.  Decide they're not cut out to be artists.  I know I've got a lot of friends like that, who've given up the dream.  I suppose the world does have its need of accountants and HR people, but it's still pretty tragic, IMO.

If we want to carry on a theme, we could call this "art seppuku".    :(
« Last Edit: June 12, 2011, 10:48:50 am by Jetrel »

Offline Lachie Dazdarian

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 141
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • The Maker Of Stuff

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #50 on: June 26, 2012, 01:16:24 pm
Very interesting thoughts Jetrel. I will remember these observations.

I am hoping that I personally started doing pixel art seriously with a more solid mindset, though, aware it will take years before I become good enough to satisfy my standards. Anything above that is an unexpected bonus. I realized that if I continue on my current path, with improvising and releasing underachievements, I will eventually give up, and that the only way is to try to improve fully committed to the process, with all its ugly aspects (leaning is hard). It took me a long time, and I realized my mistakes of waiting out. But better now than never.

Offline cels

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 259
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile

Re: THE TAO OF PIXEL ART : An interpretation

Reply #51 on: January 28, 2014, 10:15:15 am
I've read a bit of Taoist philosophy over the last few years and was thrilled to see this thread. So I'm going to see if I contribute with a bit of Tao Te Ching, even though it's probably not quite as readily applicable as, say, Bruce Lee's or Miyamoto Musashi's meditations on mastering a specific skill. Tao Te Ching is shorter than the Book of Five Rings however, so I'll start here!

II: "... the sage keeps to the deed that consists in taking no action and practices the teaching that uses no words."
To me, it's interesting to see how different pixel artists try to instruct other pixel artists or influence the community as a whole. If one were to "take the role of the female", to use an expression from Tao Te Ching, then one would perhaps instruct by using no words in the sense of focusing only on one's own art and letting the art speak for itself. Teaching by reaching a certain ideal, as opposed to guiding others directly.

III: "Not to honour men of worth will keep the people from contention; not to value goods which are hard to come by will keep them from theft; not to display what is desirable will keep them from being unsettled of mind. Therefore in governing the people, the sage empties their minds but fills their bellies, weakens their wills but strengthens their bones. He always keeps them innocent of knowledge and free from desire, and ensures that the clever never dare to act."
Ref: the debate on trophies, ratings, rankings and awards on PixelJoint. Focus on improving your craft, not being honored by others. Be careful with complimenting those who win challenges, competitions, awards, etc, lest you contribute to their external motivation, making them more concerned with praise and recognition than the "tao of pixel art".

XI: "Thirty spokes share one hub. Adapt the nothing therein to the purpose in hand, and you will have the use of the cart. Knead clay in order to make a vessel. Adapt the nothing therein to the purpose in hand, and you will have the use of the vessel. Cut out doors and windows in order to make a room. adapt the nothing therein to the purpose in hand, and you will have the use of the room. Thus what we gain is Something, yet it is by virtue of Nothing that this can be put to use."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_space

XL: "Turning back is how the way moves; Weakness is the means the way employs."
Keep returning to your earlier projects to learn from old mistakes and see how you can improve. Be malleable, always ready to look at your past and present work with fresh eyes, open to suggestions and quick to discard what you've done so far, for the sake of learning something new.

XLVII: "Without stirring abroad, one can know the whole world; Without looking out of the window, one can see the way of heaven. The further one goes, the less one knows. Therefore the sage knows without having to stir, identifies without having to see (...)"
Don't go too far in your imitation of others, trust in your own artistic sense and develop your own style. (I don't know if this is useful to others, but I personally am more of a "reactive" artist - I tend to steal different ideas from various people and try to create new and interesting combinations, and I sometimes forget to "find my own voice" as it were)

LVI: "One who knows does not speak; one who speaks does not know."
Careful when giving advice to others.

LXIII: "Lay plans for the accomplishment of the difficult before it becomes difficult; make something big by starting with it when small. Difficult things in the world must needs have their beginnings in the easy; big things must needs have their beginnings in the small. Therefore it is because the sage never attempts to be great that he succeeds in becoming great."
Start out with the basics, ensuring the use of few colours, a good composition, correct proportions, etc. Make sure you have a good foundation before proceeding to add details and fancy effects, and you won't waste so much time.

LXVII: "The whole world says that my way is vast and resembles nothing. It is because it is vast that it resembles nothing. If it resembled anything, it would, long before now, have become small."
The principles of good pixel art can be applied to anything from simple gameboy sprites to vast, fullscreen landscapes and portraits. It can be applied to photorealistic pieces or entirely abstract art. Pixel art transcends style and function.




I really wanted to find a good Lao Tzu quote where I interpreted "the uncarved block" as the individual pixel, which cannot be "carved", but I failed to do so.

« Last Edit: January 28, 2014, 10:17:48 am by cels »