AuthorTopic: Is it possible to make an animated isometric character from parts?  (Read 446 times)

Offline DrainedMan

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Programmer here. Possible dumb question but-

It is possible to build an animated isometric character up from a set of parts, for example:

If I have 3 sets trousers, 4 sets shirt, 5 sets of hat, can I combine these to make 3 x 4 x 5 types of people?

Offline eishiya

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Of course it's possible. Isometric sprites are just that - sprites. It's just a matter of layering the sections correctly, which should not be difficult as long as you don't have anything crazy like wings that are both behind and in front of the character in some frames.

Offline MysteryMeat

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Of course it's possible. Isometric sprites are just that - sprites. It's just a matter of layering the sections correctly, which should not be difficult as long as you don't have anything crazy like wings that are both behind and in front of the character in some frames.
And even that can work if you're REALLY CAREFUL about the layering and frames.
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Offline Cyangmou

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It works.
But it's always additional work for an artist to come up with a working paperdolling system, instead of normally ddrawn sprites and it usually also is more work for animating the single parts - on the other hand you have thebenefit of cmbination..
On top of that it's usually restrictive if it comes to different character body types and the artistic workload can explode easily the more different pieces you have and the more animations the characters need.

From the programming side of things you could run into trouble with performance, depending on how you store the texturesheets - especially if it's getting quite extensive.

But as I pointed out - it's mostly added workload for the artist.
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Offline surt

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And even that can work if you're REALLY CAREFUL about the layering and frames.
Don't even need to be careful if you use depth buffers, but it does add considerable extra workload for hand drawn sprites.