AuthorTopic: How do I transition from pixel art to vector art?  (Read 435 times)

Offline Invincible

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 26
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • 14086778598
    • invinciblestudios
    • View Profile

How do I transition from pixel art to vector art?

on: January 21, 2017, 06:00:50 pm
I've noticed that very few games use pixel art now, how do I make the transition from pixel to vector art? Do I need better hardware since I'm working on a laptop? What programs do you suggest I use?

Sorry if this is the wrong place to ask this, I'm still new to pixelation.

Offline eishiya

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 388
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • DerpTree
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/28889.htm
    • View Profile

Re: How do I transition from pixel art to vector art?

Reply #1 on: January 21, 2017, 07:07:34 pm
It really depends on the software you're using. Vector art is not inherently that much more intensive than raster art (of which pixel art is a subtype). There are lightweight vector editors, and there are vector editors that chug.

However, what makes you think that vector art is the way to go if pixel art isn't? Most 2D games don't use vector art, since high-res raster art is easier to author for most artists. Vector art is used, but in a narrower range of styles than high-res raster art.

Offline 32

  • 0010
  • *
  • Posts: 477
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • @AngusDoolan
    • http://pixeljoint.com/p/19827.htm
    • angusdoolanart
    • View Profile

Re: How do I transition from pixel art to vector art?

Reply #2 on: January 22, 2017, 05:51:05 am
Plus if you're going for only interested in popularity 3d is is probably the smarter move. I'll second eishiya on vector not being very popular in the 2d space as compared to hi res raster. Realistically there's no reason you can't be good at everything though so I'd be practicing it all. There's plenty of work even in pixel art if you're good at it.

You probably don't need better computer hardware but you'll definitely want a drawing tablet of some kind. For hi res you're really not going to beat Photoshop and that's most likely what you'll end up using in the industry. Gimp is just as good to learn in if you don't have a budget though, I've also heard good things about Krita though I have not used it personally. For vector you want to be looking at Illustrator or Flash as industry standard or Inkscape for free learning.

Just pick up any of this software and start drawing and google anything that you can't figure out. There's no shortage of free tutorials around the internet.

Offline Invincible

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 26
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • 14086778598
    • invinciblestudios
    • View Profile

Re: How do I transition from pixel art to vector art?

Reply #3 on: January 22, 2017, 07:40:55 pm
Oh, I grouped vector and raster into the same category. I'll download Gimp and give it a shot.

Offline Ozego

  • 0001
  • *
  • Posts: 38
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile

Re: How do I transition from pixel art to vector art?

Reply #4 on: January 25, 2017, 04:30:04 am
Actually vector is used a lot now. It is default for a lot of mobile game developers because it allows to update graphics to higher pixel density when devices and hardware become stronger and is easier to use with making marketing material. Honestly, when you are good at vector it becomes faster than raster since there is no cleanup phase. It also means you don't get 1 star reviews because the art "looks pixelated". :/ Here are a couple of picture's from my day job made in vector:


But it depends on what art style you're going for; if you like pixel art there are plenty of examples that prove that it works. So figure out if it is really vector you want. Pixel art works fine. Just make sure your art fits the game. Don't chose your artstyle based on assumptions like few games use pixel art. Analyze what kind of game you're making; figure out who it appeals to. Develop an artstyle which will both appeal to your audience and communicate what the game you're making is.

Here are the industry standard tools:
Vector: Illustrator; you will also need a mouse.
Raster: Photoshop; you will also need a wacom tablet.